Cloud Collaboration is the New Normal

CollaborationCollaboration in business used to be about face-to-face communication, involving brainstorming, notepads, extensive meetings and a single-office environment. Today, it’s all about creating similar engagement and teamwork, but without the limitation of a single location or physical closeness. This step forward is possible and popular thanks to cloud collaboration tools.

Cloud Collaboration Defined

Cloud collaboration is already extremely popular in both the consumer and business worlds. Its power lies in allowing people to work together on documents, or other data types, simultaneously. Current cloud collaboration tools include cloud word processing, spreadsheet and presentation software, as well as file sharing. The magic of cloud collaboration is that it allows people to share and edit projects at the same time. Many cloud collaboration applications also include communication tools, like chat, accessibility tools to limit who can view and edit the document, and the ability to see who else is working on the project.

It works like this:

  1. One user, from any device and any location, creates a project.
  2. This user can then extend access to others, sharing the ability to make live changes to this project.
  3. These changes are saved and synced, offering every user the same live view. And even if you make the changes offline, they will sync up as soon as you go online again!

Business Benefits of Cloud Collaboration

Email was previously the most popular way for businesses to share documents among employees. The downsides of this method included restrictions on file sizes and the fact that multiple people couldn’t work on something at the same time. Additionally, it’s easy to lose the latest version of a file when edits are constantly being sent back and forth. Ultimately, this method is unproductive.

Cloud collaboration tools, on the other hand, increase employee efficiency and productivity. They empower employees to more effectively and freely interact with each other, enhancing team communication. These applications also improve teamwork and innovation, as ideas are exchanged more easily.

Cloud collaboration tools also maintain one of the most popular benefits of cloud computing: anywhere, anytime access. These tools promote on-the-go productivity and remove the geographical barrier that used to accompany collaboration in business. This means that an employee from one side of the globe can successfully work on a project with an employee on the other side of the globe.

When it comes to the IT team, there are sometimes worries about implementing new technology. However, cloud collaboration software actually requires less maintenance than in-house options, allowing an IT team to focus their attention on more lucrative business endeavors. And since the applications are hosted externally in a provider’s data center, businesses will most likely experience higher availability and better support. A business can also quit worrying about file loss, as these documents and projects will be securely backed up and protected in the cloud environment.

We’re living in a mobile world, so it’s important to have mobile business solutions. Cloud collaboration tools provide this mobility, maximizing employees’ time, no matter where they are. It’s easy and productive to collaborate with coworkers at any time, in any location. A business will enjoy the increased productivity and efficiency, while employees will appreciate the freedom and ease.


5 Best Practices for Seamless Video Conferencing

Video and web conferencing has become more affordable and provided better quality in recent years. Video conferencing has also become a critical method of business communication in the face of decreasing travel budgets. Here, I explore some of the best practices you can bring to your video conferencing deployment to ensure that you have a reliable way for your employees to communicate with your customers, other employees, and peers.

Use Unified Communications Tools with Your Video Conferencing Tools

Whether it’s a face-to-face meeting, a dial-in conference call, or a video conference, participants complain about the amount of time spent in meetings. Meetings are a necessary evil, bringing team members and leaders together to collaborate on ideas, deal with problems, and develop solutions.

In response to the growing need and desire for video and web conferencing systems, some enterprise video conferencing vendors have expanded their relationships with other unified communications (UC) companies to deliver more integrated tools to meet the need. Ideally, a company would be able to combine its existing high-definition (HD) video, UC, and voice over IP (VoIP) tools and environments into one that’s easy for everyone to use. Currently, few successful solutions offer a complete packaged solution like this, so to improvise, you could find ways to bring your UC and video tools together.

Manage and Control

Any IT system requires full control and management to be effective. When you install management systems, you need to ensure that they will work effectively for everyone. This means that any video conferencing system must be accessible to any employee at any given time. To achieve such control, centralize your video conferencing equipment into dedicated conference rooms available on a reservation basis only.

Future-Proof Your Communications

It is essential that you select a solution that is compatible with your current software and an future upgrades of that software. As VoIP, web conferencing, and other IP-based technologies evolve, make sure that upgrades are as painless and seamless as possible with the technology you currently use. Your current IT vendor may have solutions and suggestions for how to achieve this. The vendor may also partner with other vendors that have a compatible solution.


Many employees are highly mobile, so you want to make sure you include mobility when selecting a video conferencing solution. If your employees need to be present in a meeting but are on the road, you need to ensure that they can dial in at a minimum, but the optimal goal is for them to be able to use the video aspect to gain the full effect of the meeting. Some solutions offer compatibility with iOS, Windows Phone, and Android mobile devices.

Select the Best End Points

Desktop video, executive desktops, and room-based systems are all examples of video conferencing solutions that allow users to join a video call. Desktop and executive desktop solutions are designed to be used at a workstation with high-end HD cameras. Computer-based video conferencing software contains integrated voice, web, video, presence, and chat capabilities, which makes it easy for employees to join a video conference even if they are tied up with other work. Room-based systems provide video conferencing to large conference rooms, where participants can collaborate and bring desktop users in as needed, whether they are in the same building or across the country.


Visimeet video conferencing

Click me now

This was originally posted here by Anthony Ortega
About the Author
Anthony Anthony Ortega has extensive IT support and systems engineering experience in government environments. A solutions-focused professional, he has led staff; worked in network operations support, information assurance, and change management; managed project software and licenses; and provided quality assurance. He has also developed coursework for VoIP, unified communications, and cloud computing for online colleges. Anthony is working on his Ph.D. dissertation in Organizations and Management, with a specialty in IT Management. He is an analyst with Studio B.

Unified Communications for the New Year

As mobile technology and remote accessibility continue to evolve, businesses, their employees and their customers now have a variety of devices, media types and communication platforms to choose from when building or growing their mobile workforce. While these different technologies and platforms provide effective communication on their own, full efficiency cannot be achieved – both technically and financially – if there is a lack of integration among them. As a result, the demand for multi-device connectivity to enterprise systems has grown substantially.

So, how do you meet these expectations to increase productivity, quality and efficiency for a modern workforce? Unified Communications, of course.

Bridging the Gap

Unified Communications bridges the gap between VoIP and other computer-related communication technologies. Through the real-time integration of both voice and data networks, business are able to manage every aspect of their communications in one entity, versus several – including the integration of email, voicemail, instant messaging technologies, fax, Short Message Services (SMS), web/video conferencing, screen sharing and more.

Through these real-time collaboration features, UC not only empowers people to communicate and make decisions at the rapid pace that is demanded in today’s business environment (users can save up to 20 minutes per day,) but it also reduces common communication barriers, such as the need to return missed calls and manage multiple email threads.

UC also provides businesses with the flexibility to choose and tailor the amount, and what types of communications platforms they would like to integrate, depending on what works best for their specific needs.

Consolidated Communication Tools on any Device

With UC, users can communicate with colleagues and customers from a business VoIP number on any device, including smartphones, tablets, PC desktops and desk phones, regardless of location. This means that personal numbers can be kept private, and communication delays are eliminated.

Integrated Voice

In UC strategies and solutions, hosted voice and Internet-delivered telephony services can be integrated. Hosted solutions, such as Hosted Voice, are becoming an increasingly popular choice as more companies adopt VoIP communications due to its inherent cost savings over traditional telephony, as well as the added convenience of fully managed services. These communication and collaboration features speed up almost every aspect of the business cycle, as well as provide workers with more freedom and flexibility in how they communicate and manage their communications.

Additionally, UC’s hosted voice services are a cost-saving, feature-rich, and scalable alternative to traditional and expensive phone services and equipment. With features such as self-service call routing, voicemail transcribed as email, call recording, and audio conferences, supporting a more mobile and productive work style is easily achieved.

Supporting the Needs of a Changing, Mobile Workforce

Having the ability to communicate and collaborate in real-time, no matter where you are, is advantageous for businesses of all sizes. From reduced total cost of ownership and travel time, unparalleled freedom, flexibility and productivity enhancements and more, UC solutions are an efficient way to embrace and benefit from the mobile, multi-device work style of today’s workforce.


Cloud Computing in 2015-What should we expect?

Cloud Computing in 2015

What should we expect?

In case you thought the new year meant brand new technology trends, we can set the record straight. It seems that cloud computing is officially here to stay. Businesses have moved past the introduction phase of the popular technology and are now profiting from the benefits of the cloud. Countless studies have already been conducted to predict technology trends in 2015, and cloud computing seems to top the list every time.

IT spending on cloud computing will increase 42% this year, according to the Computerworld Forecast Study 2015. The study showed that cloud initiatives are the most important for the majority of IT departments today. These initiatives are expected to cause the most disruption in the future, with a focus on improving current service and generating new revenue streams. Spending will also increase heavily on security technologies, business analytic investments, storage solutions and wireless and mobile, all of which can tie back into cloud computing. It’s clear that these trends are important, as the top three skills IT professionals need in 2015 are network security, data analytics and enterprise app development and support.

According to Gartner, cloud computing is also one of the 10 strategic technology trends for the new year. A “strategic technology trend” is defined as one with the potential for significant impact on an organization in the next three years. There will be a huge trend of moving computational power away from devices, which is where cloud computing gets involved. As consumers, we’ve quickly become accustomed to applications that can be integrated across different devices, and now this will become a business focus. Applications and information can be centrally managed, allowing users to easily access their business apps and data on any device, in any location. This popular feature of cloud computing leads to scalability, flexibility and customizability within an organization. It also allows businesses to move their focus to innovation and revenue growth.

Additionally, cloud experts have shared their opinions on this year’s technology trends. According to tech writer Paul Korzeniowski, the technology itself won’t change. The emphasis will. There will be a lot of interest in the Internet of Things, as various brands continue to explore home automation and wearable technology. While this is exciting for consumers, it will continue the heated discussion on cloud security. Especially following some major security incidents this past year, cloud computing will have to continue proving itself on that front.

There will also be an emphasis on vertical applications, as businesses realize they want tailored cloud services for their specific daily operations. Dave Wright, Chief Strategy Officer of ServiceNow, said, “As cloud platforms continue to mature, and more organizations are drawn to the financial and innovative benefits, cloud is spurring interest from even those industries that have been hesitant.” Cloud computing has the potential to impact every single industry, and businesses in all areas are realizing this.

It’s very apparent that the cloud will only continue to grow. There is a renewed confidence in the technology, cloud tools and services have matured, and the cost and efficiency benefits are obvious. Cloud computing has gained acceptance and now we get to see how drastically it can impact the business world. Get ready – 2015 is going to be an exciting year!

Keeping Video Conferencing Security in Perspective …

I was doing more research on video conferencing. I was interested because it seems to me that a cloud video conferencing service is much more secure than a stand alone system sitting behind a firewall- as long as the cloud conferencing provider is using active monitoring and industry best practices for security.

Network Security 4

I came across a fascinating blog on No Jitter by Ira M. Weinstein and Andrew W. Davis about security and video conferencing. The article can be found here.

The NSA is accused of spying on UN video conferences. What’s the most likely scenario for what really happened?

Every few months the topic of video conferencing security rears its ugly head in the media. In the last week or so, the NSA has been accused of cracking the encryption guarding the United Nations’ internal video conferencing systems. According to the well-known German magazine Der Spiegel, these NSA activities took place in the summer of 2012 and allowed the NSA to decrypt more than 450 communications. Apparently the Chinese tried to do the same thing, with unknown results.

First of all, the authors want to clarify what we don’t know. We have no first-hand knowledge of any surveillance programs in use by any entity or agency, government or otherwise. We also don’t have access to non-public details about the recent allegations. For example, we don’t know which video calls were compromised or not compromised, which locations or people participated in these sessions, or what systems, services, or networks were in use.

Here’s what we do know. Video conferencing can be very secure. The actual security level of a video call depends on a number of factors including (but not limited to) the equipment in use, the settings within the equipment, the networks in use, and the actual call settings.

Basically all video conferencing systems released in the last 10+ years have included 128-bit AES encryption. This means that calls between compatible systems should be encrypted using 128-bit encryption keys that are generated automatically at the start of each video session. Although AES is a commercial rather than military grade of encryption, AES packs quite a punch. According to a 2012 article in EE Times, a supercomputer would take 1 billion billion years to crack a 128-bit AES key using a brute force attack. Given that this is more than the age of the universe (13.75 billion years), this does not seem like a real-time risk.

And there is more. Despite the inherent security provided by 128-bit AES encryption, highly secure communication environments (e.g. the Department of Defense, Homeland Security, etc.) use additional methods to secure their communications. Most common are external, hardware-based encryption devices. These devices typically leverage multiple encryption keys including:

*A device-level physical encryption key that must be inserted in the device each time the system is used. These keys are typically exchanged every 30 days or more.

* Password keys that limit access to the device’s functions and systems.

* Session keys that are automatically generated at the start of each session. In some cases, the session keys are even changed automatically during the session.

In addition, organizations conducting secure communications typically host their traffic on secure data networks that also use advanced encryption technologies.

So what does all of this mean? It is basically impossible to gain access to an encrypted video conference.

Now the question is–what really happened? Most likely, we will never know. What we do know is that most security issues we find in the video conferencing area are related to people not following basic security policies and procedures–either knowingly or unknowingly. Common causes of weak video conferencing security include:

* Turning off encryption on video systems
* Using outdated video systems that don’t support encryption
* Failing to use the most current software on video systems/other devices
* Connecting to other devices (e.g. gateways, video bridges, etc.) that either don’t support encryption or have encryption turned off
* Using software solutions or services that either don’t encrypt or use less stringent encryption methods
* Failing to use proper passwords, not changing passwords often enough, or failing to keep those passwords secure.

These factors are NOT inherent weaknesses in video conferencing security; they are user-introduced weaknesses. This is analogous to putting money or jewels in a safe, and then either leaving the door wide open (on purpose for convenience or mistakenly) or writing the lock’s combination on a post-it note hanging on the safe itself.

While not as likely, it is also possible that the UN’s video systems themselves were compromised. For example, most video conferencing systems support remote monitoring and management. Some systems also support the streaming of video and audio content to remote users. These features are turned off by default and are password protected. If properly used, they are extremely valuable. However, if abused, these features can compromise security and provide access to secure information.

Finally, it is also possible (albeit unlikely) that someone gained access to the video systems and uploaded hacked firmware that provides back-door access to the audio and video content. (Remember the centrifuges in Iran!)

So given the limited information in hand, we believe it is far more likely that someone learned the IP address of one or more of the UN’s video systems, and then snooped on non-encrypted conferences. Perhaps the video systems in some locations were not properly configured or had encryption disabled. Who knows?

But make no mistake–given sufficient time and resources, everything is “hackable.” In the case of today’s video conferencing systems, however, the chances of successfully eavesdropping on an encrypted media exchange are extremely small, even with the resources of the NSA.

Learning how to Create Use Cases for Video Conferencing

I sat at my computer yesterday with my cloud video conferencing mentor, Dan Marchetto from Iocom. We were talking about the best ways to implement cloud video conferencing in organizations. It comes down to the “use case” more than the technology. A “use case” is just that- what are you going to do with the service once you get it. Think of it as a compelling “Why?” or “What are we seeking to do with the technology? What need does fulfill for us?”. Each organization has different needs- generally based upon industry. Therefore, you can look within your work flows specific to what you do and where you do it to look for efficiencies. I thought this was logical and fascinating. Being the web researcher I am, I immediately set to work to explore this further. I found a great paper from Frost and Sullivan from 2009 that describes this. Here is an excerpt from what they wrote: (five years later, still very relevant)

Use Cases for Videoconferencing

The best way to derive value from any technology is to use it in places where it will make the biggest difference within the organization. Videoconferencing is no exception. There are many key use cases for the technology— areas of business where using it will significantly reduce costs and/or increase productivity. Let’s look at a few of them in step two of our five-step process:


  • Training is a clear case where videoconferencing can save companies money, and their employees times and By using video to train everyone from salespeople to support staff to every employee who needs information on benefits and enrollment, companies can save money on travel and facilities costs for the attendees and trainers. They can also limit the time people spend in training to the event itself, meaning that a three-hour training session will take three hours, not 12 (or more, is flying is involved). That, of course, allows attendees to go back to their day jobs that much sooner. Using videoconferencing for training also allows benefits the trainers, who no longer need to fly around the country (or the globe) to teach. That ensures they can spend more time on prep and follow-up, and reach more people in the same amount of time. With videoconferencing, who gets trained doesn’t have to be determined by location and costs; now, everyone who could benefit from training can get it, without leaving the office.


  • Employee and recruiting interviews can be held via videoconferencing, allowing companies to reach out to more candidates, since location no longer Also, those candidates can speak with more people within the organization, without incurring travel costs for them or the interviewers.


  • Product development teams benefit from videoconferencing in two ways: The technology allows them to communicate and collaborate better, since video lets participants read body language and facial expressions; and it allows them to show team members parts, components, materials and other physical objects that relate to the particular product in development—something that would otherwise require an in-person


  • There’s a reason high-level managers and executives spend so much time traveling: Strategic planning and budget creation require open discussion and trust—two things that are best done when you can see the faces and body language of the people you are working But with videoconferencing, they can achieve the same level of intimacy without having to leave their offices, reducing the wear and tear that comes from extensive travel, freeing up time for more productive activities when they’re not in meetings and, of course, saving even more money on travel than the average employee.


  • The increasingly virtual workplace offers any number of benefits, but one thing gets lost in the translation: Team It’s tough for employees to develop deep and lasting relationships when they rarely see each other and communicate mainly via phone, e-mail and chat. But videoconferencing can change that, by making it possible for team members to see each other on a daily or weekly basis. Simply making that visual connection makes contact more personal—and that makes it easier for people to work together, because they feel like they actually know the people they are working with. That, in turn, makes it more likely that they will share information and skills, supporting each other throughout the work day and for the overall benefit of the business.


  • Finally, while some customer and partner engagements require a live, in-person meeting, many don’t—but they will benefit from the visual connection videoconferencing Just as employee relationships are deepened by videoconferencing, so, too, are those with customers and business partners.

The paper from Frost and Sullivan is a good read. If you want to download it- please click here.


If you are interested in actually trying this out, please click here and I will give you a 30 day free trial of Visimeet to develop your own use case with!



Iocom Graphic

Why Not Just Use Skype for Business Video Teleconference? Let me count the ways!

I came across this post from AGT. I thought it would be beneficial to repost it.

“Why not just Skype?”

Being a video conferencing solutions provider, we get this question a lot. And to be frank, why would you not use Skype? It’s easy to use, well-known and for the most part, free. While all those characteristics are ideal, Skype is ripe with limitations when used as a business tool versus a consumer tool. In this post we will dig into a quick comparison of Skype and business video conferencing services.

Point-to-point vs. Multi-point

A key difference is simply what each solution is designed for. Skype is optimized for point-to-point audio and video calls, which means it is designed to support two computers and two participants. You have probably seen the Skype ads showing a traveling working mom or dad speaking with their child back at home (I have to admit, those ads get me every time.) On the other hand, video conferencing is optimized for multi-point calls, which means multiple parties on multiple devices can participate in a single call. While I do not have a TV spot to reference, imagine your weekly sales meeting where you have a few co-workers in a conference room at the headquarters, a couple of people working from home on their laptops, and an executive calling from his personal Telepresence system – all in a single call.


Fortunately, video interoperability has made tremendous strides over the past two years. Thanks to smaller vendors breaking barriers, there are video conferencing services that can interoperate with standards-based video conferencing systems, in addition to a wide variety of video-enabled devices, such as tablets, smartphones and desktops. Unfortunately for Skype, their users can only connect with other Skype users and cannot connect to your traditional video conferencing equipment.


Skype requires a significant amount of bandwidth. A five-way Skype video call, which is the maximum number of participants Skype recommends, requires four times the bandwidth of a business video conferencing service. The substantial amount of bandwidth required for Skype calls can reduce or interrupt critical network performance since the Skype video traffic cannot be prioritized through the use of Quality of Service (QoS) settings. This leads to a degraded network and meeting disruptions, such as choppy audio, frozen video and dropped calls. Administrators and end users want to avoid these scenarios at all costs.

Advanced Features and Reporting

Since Skype is designed for consumers, it only offers basic features. Business video conferencing services include advanced features, such as streaming and recording, multiple screen layouts, full conference controls and real-time reporting.

Security and Control

All you have to do is Google “Skype + security” and article after article will show the security vulnerabilities associated with Skype. Business video conferencing services make security and control a top priority. Seamless firewall traversal, video call encryption, conference controls and real-time management of bandwidth are just a few capabilities that businesses should consider when seeking a video solution.


Last but not least, support services are unavailable for Skype users. There is no one to contact when a problem arises. Business video conferencing services offer a wide variety of help desk and onsite services to ensure a high level of customer service.

In conclusion, Skype is an excellent tool for keeping in touch with long distance loved ones. If you are seeking a solution that requires secure video communication, low-bandwidth and interoperability across multiple platforms and participants, I recommend a business video conferencing service.

What about you, what do you use for your business video communications?

Want to know more? 

How the Cloud Saves you Money

We’ve all heard it before: cloud computing can save you so much money! The question, though, is exactly where are these savings occurring? When businesses work with a cloud provider, they will see many existing costs transfer over, becoming the provider’s responsibility instead. While some of the savings are pretty obvious, others might surprise you. Thanks to the cloud, businesses are able to focus on developing their business while at the same time cutting major costs – it’s the basic concept of getting more for less. Let’s take a look at how the cloud can save you money:

Fully Utilized Hardware

Top-tier equipment is expensive. It’s costly to pay for the technology needed for your employees and business to work successfully. Often, businesses purchase more hardware than they need in case a failure occurs. When you switch to the cloud, you can phase out equipment that you don’t really need. Instead of purchasing all of the equipment and resources yourself, the cloud provider deals with these costs and offers the infrastructure to businesses as a service. The vendor provides you with the necessary computing resources to run your cloud solution, lowering the costs of installation, maintenance, hardware, upgrades and support. Providers also deal with redundancy so you don’t have to duplicate equipment in-house. Most cloud providers have multiple geographically-diverse data centers that mirror company data and applications so failures won’t affect your operations.

With a public cloud solution, these costs can drop even further. When you share vendor infrastructure with other organizations (which is called multi-tenancy), everyone wins. The businesses see lower costs due to shared resources, and the cloud provider optimizes hardware use.

Unique Payment Model

Most cloud providers use a pay-as-you-go model. Businesses are charged based on what they use, whether that includes the amount of storage, number of email boxes or virtual server hours – essentially, businesses rent services from the provider. This method helps businesses keep costs low by eliminating unused resources, postponing unnecessary purchases and allowing you to test solutions or programs without needing to fully commit to them.

Reduced Capital Costs

Capital costs can practically be eliminated with the cloud. There’s no need for you to invest in costly infrastructure, so you don’t see huge upfront costs. The capital investment of servers, power, software and more becomes the cloud provider’s problem. You can acquire resources quickly and easily, and the cloud provides a scalable solution to businesses. Rather than investing in resources used minimally, you can get exactly what you need, when you need it. As your business needs change, your company can increase or decrease its cloud-use accordingly. This helps keep your budget in check, while ensuring you always have what you need to operate successfully.


Software Savings

Businesses can purchase applications directly through the Web, getting immediate access to the programs they need. Rather than waiting weeks or months for company-wide installation, your business can see cloud software deployment occur in a matter of hours. When your employees spend less time waiting, they can spend more time working. This boosted productivity will definitely show in your profits. The upfront cost of licensing and price of constant upgrades can be eliminated, as you experience per-user costs and automatic upgrades instead. And if you’re not happy with the software, you can cancel the service. This greatly reduces the financial risk of software that doesn’t work for your business.


Decreased Power and Space

Idle equipment wastes both energy and money. Due to better hardware utilization, the need for excessive power is cut. The cloud makes it easy to consolidate servers, saving space and cutting power costs for everyone involved. Additionally, this consolidation optimizes the cooling of data centers. The decrease of power and space saves businesses money on office real estate, equipment and electricity while cloud providers create a smaller footprint on the environment. This is both a money-saving and Earth-saving benefit.


Reduced Labor Costs

As equipment and support is moved to the cloud provider, the responsibilities of managing, repairing and replacing infrastructure move too. Additionally, many services and tasks can be automated with the cloud. As these needs are eliminated on your end, you can free up your IT staff to focus on business development and strategy instead, areas which will ultimately make more money for the company. If necessary, you can even reduce your staff size. This is especially beneficial for small start-ups, as they are able to keep their workforce light by using cloud computing.


Flexibility and Mobility

The cloud allows users to access their business data and applications from any location and computing device at any time. While this creates dozens of new ways for businesses to operate, it also helps with cost savings. Your business data is not stored on physical devices or networks – instead, it’s stored virtually in the cloud, making it accessible to your users at all times. This means you don’t need to invest in the fanciest, most expensive computers for your office just to work efficiently. All you need are devices that can access the Internet – even a smartphone can do that! This mobility simplifies your needs and lowers your costs. Users are able to use devices they already own, like tablets, mobile phones or laptops, to be productive away from the office. On the more extreme side, this can save your employees the commute to work and even eliminate the need for a physical office.

Infographic: 5 Keys to Mobile Video

Incorporating mobile devices into enterprise videoconferencing requires a different strategy from implementing conference room video. Our new infographic shows the top five considerations when deploying mobile video solutions in the work place.

More than 70% of organizations are planning to get video capabilities within the next year, according to a study by Network Instruments.That rise in implementations means companies need to consider video in a way that is both cost-efficient in the short term and fits with long-term communications planning.

The benefits of mobile video conferencing include faster decision-making, enhanced collaboration, and improved sales and revenue. But businesses must also consider a solution that is easy to deploy and use.

See all five key considerations in our full infographic here: 5 Keys to Mobile Video.

Case study: Launching 4,000 video conferencing accounts in 5 weeks

Today’s slate of personal video conferencing systems –when deployed to a critical mass of employees – have overcome the limitations andbad reputation of the past and have significant benefits beyond travel savings:

  • Improved team building
  • Better integration of resources
  • Faster decision making 
  •  Richer interaction

 To demonstrate the capability of video in the modernworkplace, Avaya implemented the SCOPIA desktop to 4,000 users worldwide,including the management team and field sales and marketing teams.

 In the new white paper (sponsored by Avaya) “The Viabilityof Large-Scale Personal Video Conferencing Deployments,” Wainhouse Researchtook a look at the results after two months, analyzing the early conclusionsand benefits after more than 35,000 meetings with 85,000 attendees were held.

Among the conclusions:

    • “Click-to-connect” conferencingsolutions can enable sales to connect with customers and prospects with aricher, more productive interaction experience.

  • Product development and marketingteams reported that having everyone video-enabled made the teams more cohesiveand improved overall working relationships.
  • Global logistics and supply chainmanagement teams used video to reduce on-site supplier meetings and to makein-person increasingly more productive since relationships can be establishedbeforehand.

To read Wainhouse Research’s recommendations andlessons learned when implementing person video into the enterprise, downloadthe free white paper here: