Your Step by Step Guide to Mitigating and Preventing a Ransomware Virus in your Small/Medium Business

With the recent epidemic of ransomware viruses (up over 600% in 2016 and with the newest batch of exploits wreaking havoc internationally), I thought it would be a good idea to go through the basic guidelines for mitigating and containing ransomware for your small to mid sized business. There are plenty of additional pieces to putting this together completely so please reach out to me if you would like some assistance. Some of these are simple recommendations and this is by no means a complete list. But, then again, eat healthy, exercise regularly and don’t smoke are simple recommendations – and if you don’t follow them, you know what to expect.

  1. Use a reputable multi vector end point security – Use anti virus programs like Webroot/Kaspersky/McAfee/Avast. Don’t be penny wise and pound foolish. Buy a proper license for each machine. Keep it updated for all new definitions. Keep it current and get one that is constantly being updated. No one program is going to be 100% effective. Also, make sure that you have a program that detects malware. Malwarebytes Premium is my favorite. Again – go for the full paid version and don’t try to cut corners on freemium or freeware versions. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.  You need protection that is going to detect phishing from spam, detect unsafe websites and web browser protection.
  2. Put strong back up procedures in place– you should have back ups in place with a return point objective that you can live with. That means that you should have back ups both onsite on a device and in the cloud. Both of the back ups should be constantly tested for verification and the process should be monitored. When this is successfully in place, in case of an outbreak, you can restore to the last back up that was unaffected. Please note: tape drives, USB sticks, and removable hard drives are not adequate for business applications. You need a proper belt and suspenders- a properly sized on premise device that is backed up to the cloud.
  3. Make sure that you are updating your operating system and plug ins regularly – the current round of ransomware is exploiting unpatched and un-updated Windows vulnerabilities. We update our clients with whitelisted patches and updates from Microsoft. Make sure that you are constantly updating your operating system. Make sure that you are scheduling your updates properly- for all of your computers and all of your devices. Make sure you update all of your computers- even those that you may use less frequently. For example, we use micro pc’s in our conference room- for use with our large screen monitors. All of those units must be updated regularly.
  4. Make sure that your firewall is regularly updated and maintained– your firewall should be under contract and updated with the very latest definitions. Your firewall is all that stands between you and the virus filled Internet. We recommend Watchguard because it is constantly being updated and maintained – and it includes best of breed components that would be too expensive to buy separately bundled in.
  5. Disable autorun- make sure that you disable autorun for everyone!!Yes, autorun is useful. Yes, it is also used by viruses and malware to propagate itself throughout a network. In these dangerous times, disable it.
  6. Stop making everyone an Admin!! – administrators should be admins. However, if you give everyone admin rights, you open yourself up to more damage. User should be users and admins should be admins. Period.
  7. Enforce secure passwords– believe it or not, people use stupid passwords. Enough with stupid. If you want to get infected, use a simple password. If you don’t use a secure password (strong with characters, alphanumeric and symbols). Better yet, have your users get a password manager app.
  8. When relevant, encourage the use of two factor authorization– if you have compliance requirements (HIPAA or PCI) definitely use two factor authorization.
  9. Disable RDP– remote desktop protocol is used by all sorts of viruses and malware to gain access. If you don’t need it or don’t know what it is, disable it.
  10. Educate EVERYBODY– even if your office is a handful of people- but especially if you have less sophisticated users- education of the threat is important. Your staff should know what phishing, spear phishing and how to recognize and avoid suspicious emails. Incorporate this into your onboarding of new employees or have a meeting about this. If you would like a recommendation for videos, send me an email and I will send you a recommended list. Along with that, add pertinent sections to your employee manual about bringing your own device onto the network, using “free”USB drives, and clicking on links in emails.

Like I said, this is by no means a comprehensive list. I have learned Mark Twain may have had the last word. “It’s not what you know that gets you in trouble, it’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so”. The world of viruses and malware is changing. Yesterday’s method may be overcome in an instant and you have to keep on top of it. If you need help- just let me know!

 

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