Prime Telecommunications Leverages State-of-the-Art Cybersecurity Techniques and Tools to Protect Customers

Prime Telecommunications, Inc., a leading provider of unified communications, announced today that the company is leveraging state-of-the-art cyber security techniques and tools to protect customers from cyber attacks that have become a daily occurrence in the small to mid-sized business marketplace. The company has been at the forefront of cybersecurity for many years and has taken their expertise to an entirely new level, well beyond their competition. Prime Telecommunications protects businesses from several key cybersecurity threats.

The first threat facing organizations is phishing. Phishing is essentially, using fake links to lure users into offering up sensitive information, by posing as an authority. Hackers can embed malicious links into emails, attachments or images, which usually lead to another page that requests the sensitive information, which will later be used against the user. One of the most creative ways hackers have found to attack SMBs is to call in and impersonate IT staff or Network Administrators, asking for specific information off the employee’s computer to resolve a potential “virus.” The employee will usually comply and supply the information, giving the hacker the exact keys they need to infiltrate the system.

The next area of concern is mobile security. As web traffic continues to migrate from PC to mobile, hackers have followed suit by redirecting their efforts to mobile attacks, as well. At an organization, whereby users are encouraged to BYOD (bring-your-own-device) to the network, this increases the exposure for network attack exponentially. SMBs need to be on the lookout for attacks from third party apps, mobile malware and unsecured public Wi-Fi locations. For example, employees will use their phone at an unsecured Wi-Fi hotspot to work but they won’t realize that the network is rigged to enable hackers with easy access to sensitive apps, data and information on any phones connected to that particular unsecured Wi-Fi hotspot. In many cases, users will be attacked without even realizing that the attack has happened.

The last area for an SMB to monitor is malvertising. This threat is where hackers embed malware within advertisements, landing pages or even directly on reputable websites. Sites that offer advertising on a massive scale, such as Facebook, have a tough time regulating online security throughout the buying process. Facebook can do its best to ensure that the links on Facebook aren’t malicious; however, they have no access to monitoring the pages that those advertisements lead to, once the user has left Facebook. Malvertisers can embed a code on an advertisement which leads to a dummy checkout page or a fake application page, which phishes all of the sensitive information that the hacker needs to launch an attack.

“These threats all point to the importance of SMBs consulting with an expert in the cybersecurity field,” stated Vic Levinson, President at Prime Telecommunications. “We are well-equipped to deal with threats like these, in addition to the new threats that will undoubtedly arise over the coming years. For any business that leverages technology as one of its key productivity drivers, it pays to have a team like Prime Telecommunications to face the hackers of the world.”

Eight Reasons Why Small and Mid-Sized Businesses Need Managed IT Services

Managed Networks Chicago

Managed IT services is rapidly becoming one of the hottest solutions in business today because it dramatically improves an organization’s profitability, frees up internal resources, and offers a unique competitive advantage.   Simply put, managed IT services are designed to assist companies in maintaining and supporting their network and IT infrastructure with the assistance of an outsourced managed services provider (MSP).  Types of services may include remote network monitoring, programming and reporting (24/7), firewall monitoring, intrusion detection, preventative tasks, disaster recovery, data backup and help desk support.  There are eight critical reasons why small to midsized businesses (SMBs) need managed IT services now and throughout the life cycle of their business.

Dependence On IT

Almost all businesses have become more dependent on computer technologies in the past few years.  And, it’s a rapidly changing environment.  Every business has become dependent on its IT infrastructure to perform at a high level, while effectively delivering its products or services.  As a result, it has become more difficult to maintain the expertise to properly deploy, manage, and monitor this new technology, especially as a business evolves.

Complexity

The fact that this new technology is new makes it more difficult for the average employee to understand and use effectively.  The level of demand and sophistication from today’s businesses are driving up complexity.  Distinct disciplines or specialties are emerging in a variety of technology related areas such as telephony, desktop, network, application and database support.  The breadth and depth of technology an organization requires immediately places the resources at a small to mid-sized businesses (SMBs) at a distinct disadvantage.

Insufficient Solutions

Traditional support options such as a one man IT consultant, or a one or two person in-house IT department cannot effectively handle the occasional network breakdowns that are bound to occur. This is especially true when compared to a team of external resources that  proactively monitor the SMB’s installed technology at all times.

Lack of Process

An IDC study reinforces the notion of lack of process, showing that 78% of all IT downtime is caused by change.  If you could simply eliminate change from the computing environment, you would substantially decrease the risk. Unfortunately, most SMBs lack the procedures, documentation standards, and scope of work, which often results in major disruption and downtime.

Increased Use of Technology

Increasing use of computers, new software and procedures, often leads to increased complaints and loss of productivity. Typically, when network or desktop problems arise and escalate inside a company, the response time of the one man shop or internal staff is quite slow. This dramatically increases employee complaints and lowers productivity.  In many situations employees have to wait in line to receive help.  As a result the downtime and morale will impact the organization’s bottom line as well as their ability to meet their customers’ needs.  By implementing a managed IT services program, the demand on internal IT resources are lessened, and they can now be utilized for other purposes such as directly supporting strategic business objectives rather than becoming bogged down in frequent break/fix issues.

Controlling Costs

During these challenging times, the IT budget is frequently reduced.  In a recent survey of nearly 950 IT managers at companies in North America and Europe; nearly half of the U.S. respondents said they have already cut their IT spending budgets.  Unfortunately, a cut in IT spending doesn’t mean there is a cut in demand for services.  This adds tremendous stress and pressure on internal departments to support the same amount of work with fewer resources.

Technology Erosion

Computer systems must be maintained just like any other systems used within the business. Vehicle fleets, manufacturing equipment, and the physical plant, have all moved to a preventative approach. If a company does not implement this preventative maintenance strategy for its technology components, disaster might be the unpleasant and unprofitable result.

Compliance

Finally, the technology utilized within an organization in most cases must meet specific compliance standards.  For example, a company’s business processes supported by technology may need to comply with Sarbanes-Oxely, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA), Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) and other requirements. Most companies don’t have the resources to fully understand and comply with all the detailed requirements of these regulations.

All of the above issues are driving the popularity of partnering with a managed IT services firm.  Companies that have made the transition already answered this question.  If deploying, managing and monitoring my IT infrastructure has absolutely nothing to do with the core competency of my business, why wouldn’t I outsource it to an expert?  This is a fairly easy question to answer and these organizations have reaped the rewards of increased profitability and a competitive advantage.

Want a honest assessment of your network? Give us a call at 847 329 8600!

4 Top IT Decisions that Business Owners/CEOs Will Have to Make in 2015

In today’s business environment, owners need to assess the advancement in all technological areas, but paying special attention to these four areas will yield exponential benefits in the next calendar year. Here are the four decisions that need to be made:

Is It Time for Me to Downsize My In-House IT Department? IT departments have long served as a vital support structure for ensuring that all business operations run smoothly. However, as more software and hardware applications migrate to “the cloud” and the number of managed services providers grows, businesses need to start taking a hard look at whether or not it is fiscally responsible for them to pay for full-time IT staff. Advancements have made it possible for remote technicians to fix computer problems off-site and run constant monitoring, management and data optimization software to improve the efficiencies of a company’s network. In many cases, entire teams are used to ensure optimum network performance, something that a single employee cannot hope to deliver consistently. As the playing field has leveled, more sophisticated tools have been developed, making this job even more competitive. In fact, many large organizations are beginning to outsource key areas of their IT operations entirely, and it is not long before outsourced IT departments are commonplace.

Downnsize IT Department

How Can I Secure My Network From Threats? With cybercrimes on the rise, more and more businesses are beginning to take proper precautions to prevent company downtime or data loss. Spyware, malware, data backup and anti-virus protection are all vital to the economic well-being of any stable business. In emergency or negligence situations, critical data loss can set teams back for weeks and put a giant damper on productivity. Many businesses are reexamining their Acceptable Internet Usage Policies (AUPs), to make sure that employees are only visiting work-related sites when at the office. These types of threats are usually found on dangerous websites, which can be eliminated entirely with simple site filtering tools that restrict access to unnecessarily volatile sites. Many companies see this need, especially in the case where businesses derive funding from institutional and private investors. These organizations are often required to spend a significant portion of their yearly budget on security enhancing technologies to make sure that all sensitive information remains perpetually protected.

Network Security

Big Capital Expenditures or Small Cloud Transition Costs? With servers and telephony shifting from the standard on-premise solution of old, to more software-centric and remote operation, many businesses are choosing to invest heavily in the transition to the cloud. The biggest driving factor behind this decision is that from a financial standpoint, most businesses want to upgrade their technology, but don’t want to create a large amount of capital expenditures, which constrain financial resources. Technologies with rental programs, or lowered total cost structures are increasingly popular because of their minimal impact on a budget. With plenty of equipment nearly obsolete, many businesses are investigating technologies which leverage a fixed-cost of ownership in their cost structure. This helps businesses avoid big capital expenditures, keeping them lean and mean for the next year.

Cloud Hosting Icon

What’s Our Policy Regarding Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD)? Networks are the backbone of any business. However, when employees bring their own devices onto the network, they can often disrupt the infrastructure and slow the overall speed of the network drastically. Furthermore, these devices can pose as security threats when they are not properly configured to run in concert with all of the other technology endpoints on the existing network. It’s a complex web and network design is an intricate process, which is absolutely essential to get right. Some businesses refuse to let people bring their own devices onto the network, yet the vast majority of businesses allow employees to bring their own mobile devices onto the network, as long as they are properly configured by a leading technology specialist. That way, employees can utilize the tools they feel most comfortable with, without derailing anyone else’s performance on the network.

Bring your Own Device

 

Want to know more? Need help in talking out your decisions? Give us a call at 847 329 8600 and let’s begin the discussion.

Only 10% of Hospitals & Clinics Keep Their Patients’ Data Safe

According to privacy researchers at the Ponemon Institute, “Recent numbers show 90% of health care organizations have exposed their patients’ data — or had it stolen — in 2012 and 2013.” The implications of this research are far-reaching and unsettling for most consumers.

Most attacks are caused by hackers who want to acquire medical records due to their extreme value. The information in medical records (name, birthdate, addresses, phone numbers, medical history and social security numbers), can be easily used for identity theft, fraudulent medical billing or acquiring prescriptions to resell on the street. Hackers can use the medical information to accomplish just about anything once acquired. This flaw in IT security is not a series of isolated incidents but an incredibly widespread problem now affecting millions of people across the nation.

In August, Community Health Systems reported that Chinese hackers had allegedly stolen a staggering 4.5 million patient records in what could be the largest breach of patient data to date. The company is treating the breach as a violation of HIPPA, even though the hackers didn’t gain access to medical records (only names, addresses, birth dates, phone numbers, and Social Security numbers were stolen). The breach happened between April and June this year, and was discovered in July. According to cyber-security firm Mandiant, which helped investigate the breach, the group responsible for the attack is known as “APT 18,” and may have links to the Chinese government.

The majority of hospitals and health organizations are using outdated technology on a single network making the job of hacking into networks even easier for criminals. IT security is often a large oversight for healthcare organizations because their objective is to save lives. Unfortunately, lack of internal IT expertise and outdated technology plagues the healthcare industry making it an easy target.

The challenge here is that doctors are inherently more interested in saving lives, instead of upgrading their IT security. This a great thing for society and we believe that’s exactly what doctors should be focused on! The only thing is that IT security must be addressed too. Over the years, we’ve learned exactly what it takes to protect health organizations and we love being a part of the solution to this problem. It’s unfortunate when something like this happens but it brings much needed education to the issues at hand. We consider it our duty to educate our market and provide doctors with the technology tools they need to do their jobs, protect their  patients and spend their time focused on saving lives, instead of firewalls. That’s our job.

6 Huge Benefits of Managed IT Service

As the shape of global business continues to shift, companies big and small are determining how to incorporate new technologies. But while growth and operational decentralization have obvious benefits for long-term goals, they also present a new series of ground-level issues that can no longer be solved by local teams.

Enter Managed Services.

Developed to be scalable as a small business grows into a large, mobile one, this type of service combines the latest network technology with network monitoring, allowing a hands-off approach to managing networks and software. Agents can troubleshoot and fix most issues that occur from a remote location, further ensuring consistent access and functionality throughout the entire communications experience.

There are many reasons why managed services are making waves in all industries, but here are six that will blow your mind:

1. Quick recovery: With complex processes available to managed services providers, businesses can track and respond almost immediately to any events that may occur across their communications platforms. Gone are the days of scrambling from one problem to the next in an effort to simply keep projects and operations on track. With managed services, quick efficient fixes help businesses focus on growth.

2.  Before It Even Happens: Thanks to helpful remote tracking, complex remote service systems can predict where problems may arise, preventing them before they even happen. Businesses can operate with confidence knowing that issues can get tackled before they even occur, thus lowering the risks involved in important projects and operations.

3. Proper Planning: By further monitoring the ways in which a client utilizes their network systems, managed services providers can alleviate redundant operations, free-up file space, and further streamline formal processes. This allows clients to accurately predict their future performance needs and make informed decisions regarding infrastructure and database.Flat Rate ITFlat Rate IT

4. Built-in HUD: Through client portals created by managed services providers, clients can access network and performance data in real time and respond immediately. Service tickets can be logged and saved, and critical processes are monitored constantly by management. These client dashboards can even be customized specifically to a business’ needs. Whether a client wants to view real-time operational data at a high level, or an ultra-specific one, a managed services dashboard allows business owners to keep an eye on the prize from the helm of the ship.

5. Lightning Fast Updates: Managed services allow IT staff and developers to step back from the seemingly endless troubleshooting and problem solving of old systems and focus on future development and patching. Managed services providers can manage patches continuously; with this in place, downtime becomes few and far between

6. Big Picture Infrastructure: The in-depth, real-time monitoring provided by managed services gives companies a full understanding of the ins-and-outs of their infrastructure. Timely reviews prior to large projects, updates, and rollouts give business owners a full understanding of the ramifications of each decision they make, so that they can remain informed as they make crucial changes to the way they do business. Managed services highlight the weak points and problem areas so that companies can prioritize resources.

With all of these benefits in mind, it’s easy to see…Managed Services is the next step in technological business development, and a crucial linchpin in the scaling of a rising company.

Learn more: http://www.primetelecommunications.com/flat-rate-it-support/

Microsoft Ending Support for Windows Server 2003 Operating System

NCCIC / US-CERT

National Cyber Awareness System:

11/10/2014 07:19 AM EST
Original release date: November 10, 2014

Systems Affected

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 operating system

Overview

Microsoft is ending support for the Windows Server 2003 operating system on July 14, 2015.[1] After this date, this product will no longer receive:

  • Security patches that help protect PCs from harmful viruses, spyware, and other malicious software
  • Assisted technical support from Microsoft
  • Software and content updates

Description

All software products have a lifecycle. End of support refers to the date when Microsoft will no longer provide automatic fixes, updates, or online technical assistance.[2] As of July 2014, there were 12 million physical servers worldwide still running Windows Server 2003.[3]

Impact

Computer systems running unsupported software are exposed to an elevated risk to cybersecurity dangers, such as malicious attacks or electronic data loss.

Users may also encounter problems with software and hardware compatibility since new software applications and hardware devices may not be built for Windows Server 2003.

Organizations that are governed by regulatory obligations may find they are no longer able to satisfy compliance requirements while running Windows Server 2003.

Solution

Computers running the Windows Server 2003 operating system will continue to work after support ends. However, using unsupported software may increase the risks of viruses and other security threats. Negative consequences could include loss of confidentiality, integrity, and or availability of data, system resources and business assets.

The Microsoft “Microsoft Support Lifecycle Policy FAQ” page offers additional details.[2]

Users have the option to upgrade to a currently supported operating system or other cloud-based services. There are software vendors and service providers in the marketplace who offer assistance in migrating from Windows Server 2003 to a currently supported operating system or SaaS (software as a service) / IaaS (infrastructure as a service) products and services.[4,5] US-CERT does not endorse or support any particular product or vendor.

References

Revision History

  • November 10, 2014: Initial Release

 

Our partnership with Rapidscale allows you to never have to worry about these types of announcements ever again.

CloudApps is the next generation application purchasing and licensing management platform for business. CloudApps connects businesses with the applications they want while eliminating licensing management and application upgrades. With CloudApps, the application purchasing process is automated from per user or per business purchasing to application approval workflow delivered on one bill.

Check out more at http://www.primetelecommunications.com/infrastructure-service/.

Cybercrooks target SMBs with new types of attacks

Network World – As money and corporate information have morphed from hard currency and blueprints to digital files, small and midsized businesses have become the new banks to rob. In fact, bank robberies across the U.S. have plummeted from 9,400 in 1991 to just 3,870 last year. As Doug Johnson of the American Bankers Association puts it: “As more and more transactions become electronic, more bank crimes become electronic.”

Look at it from the criminals’ perspective: why risk getting arrested breaking into an engineering company or, worse, shot sticking up a bank when you can sit in an ergonomic office chair with an espresso on your desk and music in the background while plundering small companies thousands of miles away?

To read the full article click here!

For videos on security, visit our libray by clicking here!

 

Plug It – But Change the Password Before You Play It!

In today’s technology environment, whether personal or business, every device and most software packages come with default passwords. When these devices are installed, users frequently leave the default passwords in place. When default passwords are left unchanged, any person with less than perfect scruples (read: MALICIOUS HACKERS) can access your device and gain access to other devices on your network.

Although it sounds absurd, many people do not think about changing their passwords on their routers, on their firewall appliances or on their MAC addressed devices. Using easily available tools on the Internet, the type of device can be easily determined. Other sites have published default passwords or administrative passwords for commonly installed devices and appliances. This potentially puts millions of devices – with IP addresses and MAC addresses- at risk for exploitation.

Some examples that you may not think about: smart TVs, gaming consoles, refrigerators, industrial control systems, business phone systems and voice mail systems. This is in addition to the regular favorites – routers, wireless access points, firewalls and computers.

According to the US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) a hacker with knowledge of the password and network access to a system can log in, usually with root or administrative privileges. The consequences depend on the type and use of the compromised system. Examples of incident activity involving unchanged default passwords include

  • Internet Census 2012 Carna Botnet distributed scanning
  • Fake Emergency Alert System (EAS) warnings about zombies
  • Kaiten malware and older versions of Microsoft SQL Server
  • SSH access to jailbroken Apple iPhones
  • Cisco router default Telnet and enable passwords
  • SNMP community strings

The first thing that you can do to address this problem is to always – ALWAYS- give a device a unique non default password. Recommended passwords should be strong- meaning that the include both alpha numeric characters, capitals and symbols (!,@,#,$,% & ).

If you manage technology for others – coworkers, clients, family members or friends- always enforce a password changing policy when you set up new devices. Always change passwords from default passwords.

More importantly, restrict access to your network. Make sure that only those users who should be allowed on the network are allowed on your network. With the amount of cyber attacks growing at an alarming rate, the safety of information on a network is only as good as the passwords restricting access to the network.

If you are interested in seeing how secure your network is, there are a number of legitimate sites that will show you how to scan your network for vulnerabilities and secure the access.

For more information on how you can put together all of the pieces of your business’s IT puzzle, visit http://www.primetelecommunications.com/data-solutions. Other great sources of information are the US Computer Emergency Readiness Team at http://www.us-cert.gov/ncas.

Prime is Coming out of the (Phone) Closet- Cloud Computing, Cloud Phones, Cloud Business Management

We went to a seminar this past week. We followed up with some pretty intensive vendor training from our partners- and there will be more on their offerings in the coming weeks. We learned a lot- and would love to share it with you.

Here are some reasons to give serious consideration to cloud-based business services.

BYOD

The “bring your own device” (BYOD) movement is rapidly altering the business landscape. Employees want to use the power and convenience of their smartphones to access data, sales reports, and other tools to enhance efficiency. Likewise, enterprises appreciate what improved productivity generated by the BYOD movement can do for the bottom line.

Immunity From Disaster

Another major benefit of the cloud is disaster management. Cloud-based communications systems include automatic redundancy. Voice, data, and all digital information are typically routed to multiple data centers. The days of a business losing business hour-by-hour when its phone system goes down is a thing of the past. Fires, super storms, equipment failures, and even cyber-attacks are no match for the built-in redundancy of IP-based telecommunications.

Those that had embraced VoIP phones and cloud-based computing on the East Coast prior to Superstorm Sandy were often able to continue operations when others with traditional systems were down for days.

Business Management “To Go”

For business managers and executives, cloud-based operations allow them to, in fact, be “two places at once.” One can head out to an impromptu but vital sales call without worrying about what will be missed while you’re gone. The advantages of a fully integrated system go well beyond the mere ability to stay in touch via smartphones. Full, seamless integration of all company operations is possible in the cloud, and it can be done securely.

OfficeSuite is one such platform that can integrate your office phones, mobile devices, and data networks into a single system. Over 100,000 business professionals nationwide already enjoy the ease and efficiency of cloud-based communications and business management. Companies like Broadview Networks has already helped many clients to realize productivity gains through OfficeSuite’s business phone systems.

No longer want to be tethered to your office phone? Move your operations to the cloud and you will feel liberated as you can conduct essential business from anywhere at any time – and on any device.

Scalability

Phones that work over the Internet can be set up without the need for telephone installers at your premises. Better yet, as soon as you add staff or new locations, the system is readily scalable. Grow as you need to without having to spend precious capital for new equipment. As you grow, simply add new licenses for your new employees and set them up on the system in minutes.

The number of businesses around the world that will be using Internet-based phone systems is expected to double in 2013, to over 100 million. There’s a reason for this communications revolution, so see how your productivity can soar with cloud phones and cloud-based business management.

What can Napster teach us about the consumerization of IT (BYOD)

The article was published in Forbes magazine – here is the complete link: http://www.forbes.com/sites/netapp/2012/11/07/napster-byod/ This is a guest post by Jesse Lipson, VP and GM of Data Sharing, Citrix. I think that it is a great article- exceptionally well written and concise.

 
The music industry has undergone quite a transformation over the last 15 years. Of course, we can often apply lessons from other industries to our own.

Napster

source: Rhapsody

Back in the 1990s, if I heard a song I really liked on the radio and wanted to buy it, I’d have to make a trip to the record store. After battling traffic and jockeying for a parking spot, I’d rifle through the CD selection and—if it was in stock—I’d pay $15–$20 for the privilege (even if there were just a few songs on the album that I wanted).

This was a great model—for the record labels. But for music lovers, it was inefficient and expensive. Then Napster came and changed everything.

In many ways, Napster is like the BYOD trend. Read on: I’ll tell you why and I’ll give you my top tips to avoid bringing your own security nightmare…

Bring Your Own Piracy

With Napster, if someone heard a song they liked on the radio, all they did was type the name into a search box; they could download it instantly, for free. And they could share it with their friends.

Users loved Napster, but deep down we all knew that the model wasn’t sustainable: Napster lacked a way for musicians and labels to monetize and protect their intellectual property.

To cut a long story short, all that changed in 2003, when Apple released the iTunes Music Store: It helped resolve the conflict between the old and new models of music consumption. But iTunes wasn’t quite as convenient as Napster. Downloaded songs were protected from sharing by digital rights management (DRM) and they cost 99 cents each.

However, iTunes did allow users to buy music from the comfort of their own home, while letting the music industry monetize and protect their songs. Apple was able to satisfy both parties.

Standardization vs. Cowboys

The consumerization of IT is now driving a similar transformation in enterprise hardware and software. The traditional IT model is what I call Standardization, where employees are issued company-owned mobile devices, and forced to use infrequently updated software that’s only accessible inside the firewall.

There are benefits to Standardization, but it’s increasingly untenable: Employees come to expect the same ease of use and performance from the software they use at work as they do from the software they use at home, like Facebook and Twitter.

Frustrated with the inefficiencies of the old Standardization model, many employees are embracing a new model, which I call Cowboy Consumerization. They’re buying their own phones and tablets, installing their own software to store and manage company data.

Just like Napster, Cowboy Consumerization provides users with efficiency and productivity. But also like Napster, we know that Cowboy Consumerization simply isn’t sustainable.

So how Widespread is it?

According to an August 2012 Enterprise Strategy Group report, 70% of organizations know or suspect their employees are using personal online file sharing accounts without formal IT approval.

I spoke with a group of CIOs at Citrix Synergy three weeks ago. They were seriously concerned about the security risks that personal file sharing solutions pose within their organizations.

Among their top security worries:

  • How do I protect corporate data and intellectual property if an employee leaves the company or loses their device?
  • How do I ensure compliance with, say, HIPAA or FINRA rules, if we can’t see how employees store and share corporate data?
  • How do I ensure that we’re honoring customer and partner contracts that require their data to be stored on-premises, in specific geographic regions, or with certain encryption standards?

Ultimately, IT needs to follow the example of iTunes and create a solution that combines elements of Standardization and Consumerization. There has to be a happy medium between those two models.

Here are some guidelines on how to square that circle:

  • For company-issued mobile devices, use mobile device management or mobile application management (MAM) software for application provisioning and application/device wiping.
  • For BYOD mobile devices, use a MAM solution to manage business apps on the device while letting the end user manage their own personal apps. That way, if the employee leaves or the device is lost, you can wipe just the corporate data from it.
  • Enterprise apps need to be updated more rapidly than IT typically considers acceptable. Remember, you’re competing with consumer apps like Facebook and Twitter; employees have higher usability expectations. If you can’t keep pace, consider using a cloud vendor to deliver your apps.
  • Different enterprises need to comply with different laws and regulations. Make sure that the software you adopt provides you with account-level preferences to allow you to tweak security settings. You need to meet your needs today, but also be able to revisit down the road, based on user feedback.
  • Make sure that the new tools you adopt allow you to take advantage of existing investments, such as network shares or SharePoint.

As you evaluate the right BYOD strategy, think about Napster and the importance of creating a happy medium between security and convenience.

For more information about setting up your own BYOD policies- check out our FREE VIDEO LIBRARY at http://www.primetelecommunications.com/video-library-byod-bring-your-own-device/