The week in BREACH!!

Success Rate of Phishing by Day

 

This week you’ll hear how a supply chain attack could snatch your customers’ credit card information right from underneath you and why Google+ goes bye-bye.

Dark Web ID Trends:

  • Total Compromises: 974
  • Top Source Hits: ID Theft Forum (501)
  • Top PIIs compromised: Domains (973)
    • Clear Text Passwords (498)
  • Top Company Size: 11-50
  • Top Industry: High-Tech & IT

United States – Shopper Approved
https://www.zdnet.com/article/new-magecart-hack-detected-at-shopper-approved/
Exploit: Malicious code.
Shopper Approved: Utah-based company that provides a review widget for other companies’ websites, that allows customers to post reviews.
Risk to Small Business: 2.111 = Severe: This is another attack conducted by one (or more) of the several groups who operate under a similar style, given the term Magecart as a general identifier. Magecart is also responsible for the hacking of Ticketmaster and British Airways.

If your business uses Shopper Approved, you should remove the code from your website immediately.

Individual Risk: 2.428 = Severe: Those affected by this breach should cancel their credit cards and enroll in a credit monitoring service.
Customers Impacted: Unclear how many customers were affected by this breach, but only sites with the widget code on their checkout pages had credit card information compromised. The incident only lasted 2 days before being discovered, a much shorter span than many of the other Magecart breaches.
How it Could Affect Your  Business: A breach of this kind can often go unknown for a long period of time while the hackers collect valuable user data and credit card information. Even though it is a third party who was breached, it will be your business that takes the PR damage.
ID Agent to the Rescue: Spotlight ID™ by ID Agent offers comprehensive identity monitoring that also includes credit monitoring. Learn more: https://www.idagent.com/identity-monitoring-programs
Risk Levels:
1 – Extreme Risk
2 – Severe Risk
3 – Moderate Risk
*The risk score is calculated using a formula that considers a wide range of factors related to the assessed breach.

United States – Rebound Orthopedics and Neurosurgery
https://cyware.com/news/hackers-hit-rebound-orthopedics-neurosurgery-2800-patient-records-compromised-026125d8
Exploit: Compromised employee credentials.
Rebound Orthopedics and Neurosurgery: Vancouver-based orthopedics and neurosurgery practice.
Risk to Small Business: 1.555 = Severe: This breach would have a long-lasting effect on customer trust for any business, and in many countries the government will fine an organization heavily for failing to secure health data.
Individual Risk: 2.142 = Severe: Health information is valuable data for hackers and useful for identity theft. Those affected by this breach are at a severe risk for insurance fraud and identity theft.
Customers Impacted: 2800.
How it Could Affect Your Business: Organizations that store health information are held to a higher standard for securing data due to the sensitive nature of the information and HIPAA laws. When an organization fails to keep the data secure, it reflects very poorly on the company and usually results in a fine from the government.
ID Agent to the Rescue: Spotlight ID by ID Agent offers comprehensive identity monitoring that can help minimize the fallout from a breach such as this. Learn more: https://www.idagent.com/identity-monitoring-programs
Risk Levels:
1 – Extreme Risk
2 – Severe Risk
3 – Moderate Risk
*The risk score is calculated using a formula that considers a wide range of factors related to the assessed breach.


In Other News:

Google –
Google+ will be shutting down, and yes Google+ is (or at least was) still around. After exposing more than 500,000 users’ data to external developers, the tech giant has decided the best course of action is to close down the failed social network. This move makes sense given the recent outrage against Facebook after the social media site exposed 50 million people’s data. An unfortunately fitting ending to the continuously failing website.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/google-exposed-user-data-feared-repercussions-disclosing-public-170304936–finance.html?soc_src=newsroom&soc_trk=com.apple.UIKit.activity.CopyToPasteboard&.tsrc=newsroom

Podcasts:
Know Tech Talks – Hosted by Barb Paluszkiewicz
The Continuum Podcast
Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte
Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)
Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!


A note for you:
e-mail….ware
New research has revealed that a whopping 90% of all malware is delivered via email. The team also discovered that the average employee will not go 48 hours without seeing a phishing message.  In addition, over half of the phishing messages examined used the word “invoice” in the subject line. A little under a quarter (21%) of the flagged emails also had malicious attachments sent with the phishing message.

Watch out for suspicious emails! All it takes is one employee to fall for a phishing email and an entire organization can be compromised.

https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/most-malware-arrives-via-email/d/d-id/1333023

 

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The Week In Breach October 1 2018

 

 

Cyber awareness Match

 

This week Medical Data is on our minds, due to a new study on the healthcare industry and cyber security. Facebook and the United Nations were also breached this week, and both were very large datasets, impacting tens of millions of people.

Dark Web ID Weekly Trends:

  • Total Compromises: 861
  • Top Source Hits: ID Theft Forum
  • Top PIIs compromised: Domains
    • Clear Text Passwords: 501
  • Top Company Size: 11-50
  • Top Industry: High-Tech & IT

United States – Facebook

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/28/technology/facebook-hack-data-breach.html

Exploit: Web vulnerability.
Facebook: Facebook is a social media platform that is one of the Internet’s most popular websites.
Risk to Small Business: 2.333 = Severe: The loss of trust any organization would feel after a breach of this magnitude would greatly harm the organization’s ability to retain or obtain customers.
Individual Risk: 2.571 = Moderate: The data accessed puts those affected by this breach at an increased risk for identity theft, spam and targeted phishing campaigns.
Customers Impacted: 50 million.

How it Could Affect Your Business: Facebook being such a large and widely-used social media platform means that it has data on a large amount of the population that uses the Internet. If employees post information to this site, they could now be open to targeted phishing campaigns and spam.

Risk Levels:
1 – 1.5 = Extreme Risk
1.51 – 2.49 = Severe Risk
2.5 – 3 = Moderate Risk

*The risk score is calculated using a formula that considers a wide range of factors related to the assessed breach.

United States – Aspire Health

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/nation-now/2018/09/26/aspire-health-hacked-phishing-scheme-patient-health-data/1430262002/

Exploit: Compromised email account hacked through a phishing scheme.
Aspire Health: According to Aspire health website, “Aspire Health specializes in providing an extra layer of support and relief from stress, pain and symptoms to patients facing a serious illness.”
Risk to Small Business: 2.333 = Severe: The risk to small business is severe due to medical data as well as confidential information being accessed.
Individual Risk: 2.571 = Moderate: The data accessed puts those affected by this breach at an increased risk for identity theft.
Customers Impacted: This information has not been released as the investigation is ongoing.

How it Could Affect Your Business: Breaches that involve medical data can have serious long-lasting effects on the reputation of a business, due to the sensitive nature of the data.

ID Agent to the Rescue: Spotlight ID by ID Agent offers comprehensive identity monitoring that can help minimize the fallout from a breach such as this. Learn more: http://downloads.primetelecommunications.com/Dark-WeB

Risk Levels:
1 – 1.5 = Extreme Risk
1.51 – 2.49 = Severe Risk
2.5 – 3 = Moderate Risk

*The risk score is calculated using a formula that considers a wide range of factors related to the assessed breach.

United Nations

https://cyware.com/news/united-nation-wordpress-site-publicly-exposes-thousands-of-resumes-2f2a8cf1

Exploit: WordPress Vulnerability.
United Nation: An intergovernmental organization tasked to promote international cooperation and to create and maintain international order.
Risk to Small Business: 2.333 = Severe: While the United Nations is unlikely to see any repercussions for this breach, a small business would face serious PR consequences if they experienced a breach such as this.
Individual Risk: 2.714 = Moderate Risk: Resumes contain a significant amount of personal information and job history, which can be used for spear phishing attacks and identity theft.
Customers Impacted: Resumes that have been submitted to the UN since 2016.

How it Could Affect Your Customer’s Business:  The exposure of resumes for 2 years would deal a serious blow to an organization of any size: the amount of time the data was exposed, and the type of data included in resumes makes this breach score severe on our risk score scale.

Risk Levels:
1 – 1.5 = Extreme Risk
1.51 – 2.49 = Severe Risk
2.5 – 3 = Moderate Risk

*The risk score is calculated using a formula that considers a wide range of factors related to the assessed breach.


In Other News:

No Fly Zone
The Dark Web is known to have all things illegal for sale, from medical information to illicit drugs. A new trend has been discovered by researchers where frequent flyer miles are being sold for significantly less than what legitimate buyers would pay. The average rate that a batch of frequent flyer miles sells for is $31, although the price depends on the airline and number of miles.
https://www.hackread.com/stolen-frequent-flyer-miles-of-top-airlines-sold-on-dark-web/

Podcasts:
Know Tech Talks – Hosted by Barb Paluszkiewicz
The Continuum Podcast
Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte
Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)
Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!


A note for you:

The Cost of Healthcare on The Dark Web.
We all know that compromised health records and other medical information is highly valuable and sought after on the Dark Web. A new study by JAMA helps us conceptualize the volume of medical information for sale, and how much your health records go for on the Dark Web.

The annual data breach tally has increased every year since 2010 (except for 2015). The median number of records accessed per breach: 2,300. The mean number of records accessed per breach: 84,456. With patient records selling on the Dark Web for $300 – $500, hackers could make close to $700,000 ($690,000) by breaching an organization that stores medical information.

Who in the healthcare sector was hit the hardest?

  • Healthcare providers: 1,503 data breaches or 37.1 million records
  • Health plans: 278 data breaches or 110.4 million records

Be careful where you allow your medical records to be stored!
https://www.hcanews.com/news/yes-healthcares-data-breach-problem-really-is-that-bad

This Week in Breach September 18 2018

This week an Australian Mint was breached, as well as an airline from the UK. While searching for user credentials on the Dark Web, our team collects statistics on a wide variety of variables related to the data we unearth. The trends we see have been kept in house…until now. Introducing the newest addition to This Week in Breach:

Trends in data found on the Dark Web this week:

  • Top Source Hits: ID Theft Forums (8,534)
  • Top PIIs Compromised: Clear Text Passwords (8,460)

Australia – The Perth Mint
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-08/perth-mint-data-breach/10217258
Exploit: Under investigation.
The Perth Mint: The Online Depository of The Perth Mint that was breached allows users to buy and sell precious metals.
Risk to Small Business: Severe: A breach with sensitive data such as account information can deal a significant blow to customer trust.
Individual Risk: Severe: The victims of this breach are at risk of identity theft.
Customers Impacted: 13.

How it Could Affect Your Customers’ Business: The Mint was breached via a third – party provider. The breach was contained to customers of their online depository, and the organization has confirmed that all investments held at the mint are secure.

ID Agent to the Rescue: Spotlight ID by ID Agent offers comprehensive identity monitoring that can help minimize the fallout from a breach such as this. Learn more: https://www.idagent.com/identity-monitoring-programs

Average: 2.22 = Severe*
Risk Levels:
1 – Extreme Risk
2 – Severe Risk
3 – Moderate Risk

*The risk score is calculated using a formula that takes into account a wide range of factors related to the assessed breach.

United Kingdom – British Airways
https://www.wired.com/story/british-airways-hack-details/
Exploit: cross-site scripting.
British Airways: A UK based airline.
Risk to Small Business: Severe: This was a targeted breach by a group that is linked to the Ticketmaster breach, the extent and type of data accessed could erode customer trust
Individual Risk: Severe: Those affected by this breach have a much higher risk of identity theft.
Customers Impacted: 380,000 payment cards.

How it Could Affect Your Customers’ Business: This was a targeted breach by a group that is linked to the Ticketmaster breach, dubbed ‘Magecart’ by researchers that is known for credit card skimming on the web. The attack was tailored specifically to British Airways infrastructure and shows a level of sophistication to the attack group and leads researchers to believe the group is increasing their efforts.

ID Agent to the Rescue: Spotlight ID by ID Agent offers comprehensive identity monitoring that is vital for those affected by a breach such as this. Learn more: https://www.idagent.com/identity-monitoring-programs

Average: 2 = Severe*
Risk Levels:
1 – Extreme Risk
2 – Severe Risk
3 – Moderate Risk

*The risk score is calculated using a formula that takes into account a wide range of factors related to the assessed breach.


In Other News:
Bluetooth Bite  Millions of mobile devices  are vulnerable to Bluetooth exploits, with a almost half of the devices being Android phones running older versions of the operating system. This vulnerability can be used to facilitate  ‘Airborne’ attacks, which allow Bluetooth devices to broadcasts malware to other devices in close proximity. This is significant because BlueBorne, a malware exploiting this vulnerability, does not need to pair with a device to infect it… in fact the target device does not even need to be in discoverable mode.

https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/2-billion-bluetooth-devices-remain-exposed-to-airborne-attack-vulnerabilities/d/d-id/1332815

Search and Destroy
Researchers have noticed an increased presence of malware that assesses the target device before delivering the full payload. This is useful for the attacker because they can now target specific computers. . Customizing the payload delivered by the malware can lead to some very tailored and hard-to-detect exploits. As of now these ‘scouting’ tactics are far from the standard, but it is likely we will continue to see these methods increase in popularity.

https://www.scmagazine.com/home/news/uptick-in-malware-designed-to-size-up-targets-before-launching-full-payload/

Podcasts:

Know Tech Talks – Hosted by Barb Paluszkiewicz
The Continuum Podcast
Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte
Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)
Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show


 

Your Best Bet Is to Vet.
Two thirds of organizations sampled across sectors experienced a software supply chain attack in the last 12 months (Crowdstrike).  The increase in supply chain attacks can be linked to many things, but one of the most significant factors is the fact that cyber security is becoming a priority for organizations across the board. This pushes bad actors to try and find new ways to infiltrate their target.

These attacks often utilize compromised credentials and are widespread, attacking an organization with legitimate software packages to make the attack difficult to detect. One way that businesses can prevent supply chain attacks is better supplier vetting. If an organization can effectively vet their suppliers and hold them to the same cybersecurity standards that they hold themselves, then the chance of an attacker being able to infiltrate the network is significantly reduced. With the right tools and knowledge, supply chain attacks can be made less dangerous or avoided entirely.

https://www.darkreading.com/risk/the-increasingly-vulnerable-software-supply-chain/a/d-id/1332756

 

 

The Week In Breach: August 22 to August 29 2018

A slow, but troubling week to say the least!  Phishing and compromised databases still rule the day. This Week in Breach highlights incidents involving a New York-based gaming developer, medical data held by a University, and the disclosure of sensitive data held by a popular babysitter application.

Is Breaking Bad?
A German company by the name of Breaking Security has been up in arms about the use of their legitimate software named Remcos (Remote Control and Surveillance). Remcos is used for managing Windows systems remotely and is increasingly being used by hackers for malicious attacks known as Remote Access Trojan (RAT). The question is, however… are they telling the truth? Researchers have uncovered that the product sold by the company is widely advertised on Dark Web hacking forums and it seems that not only does the organization know that this is happening, they are encouraging it. Breaking Security has strongly stated that any license linked to malicious hacking campaigns are revoked, yet still, many hacking campaigns continue to use the service.
https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/attackers-using-legitimate-remote-admin-tool-in-multiple-threat-campaigns/d/d-id/1332631

Not So Private Messages
In May, the popular live streaming service, Twitch, exposed user’s private messages because of a bug in their code. The Amazon subsidiary disabled the service, which allowed users to download an archive of past messages. When a user requested this archive, the game streaming company accidentally intertwined messages from other users. Twitch has come out and said that this only affected a limited number of users and has provided a link for customers to visit so they can find out if any of their messages were exposed and what the messages were.
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/twitch-glitch-exposed-some-users-private-messages/

Podcasts:
Know Tech Talks – Hosted by Barb Paluszkiewicz
IT Provider Network – The Podcast for Growing IT Service
The Continuum Podcast
Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte
Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!


United States – Augusta University
Exploit: Email compromise by phishing attacks.
Risk to Small Business: High: This is a significant breach in scale and severity, and due to the sensitive nature of the data compromised the organization will likely face heavy fines.
Individual Risk: Extreme: Individuals affected by this breach are at high risk for identity theft, as well as their medical information being sold on the Dark Web.
Augusta University: Georgia based healthcare network.
Date Occurred/Discovered: September 10, 2017 – July 11, 2018
Date Disclosed: August 20, 2018
Data Compromised:

  • Medical record numbers
  • Treatment information
  • Surgical details
  • Demographic information
  • Medical data
  • Diagnoses
  • Medications
  • Dates of services
  • Insurance information
  • Social Security numbers
  • Driver’s license numbers

Customers Impacted: 417,000
https://cyware.com/news/augusta-university-health-breach-exposes-personal-records-of-over-400k-patients-432de74e

https://www.augusta.edu/notice/message.php

United States – Animoto
Exploit: Undisclosed.
Risk to Small Business: High: A breach of customer trust, especially involving geolocation data, can be highly damaging to a company’s image.
Individual Risk: Moderate: Users affected by this breach are at a higher risk of spam and phishing.
Animoto: New York-based company that provides a cloud-based video-making service for social media sites.
Date Occurred/Discovered: July 10, 2018
Date Disclosed: August 2018
Data Compromised:  

  • Names
  • Dates of birth
  • User email addresses
  • Salted and hashed passwords
  • Geolocation

Customers Impacted: Unclear.
https://techcrunch.com/2018/08/20/animoto-hack-exposes-personal-information-geolocation-data/

United States – Sitter
Exploit: Exposed MongoDB database.
Risk to Small Business: High: Most customers would be uncomfortable with a company leaking data about their kids and when they are left alone with someone who doesn’t live there.
Individual Risk: High: A lot of sensitive personal information was exposed in this breach, much of it unsettling.
Sitter: An app that connects babysitters and parents.
Date Occurred/Discovered: August 14, 2018
Date Disclosed: August 14, 2018
Data Compromised:

  • Encrypted passwords
  • Number of children per family
  • User home addresses
  • Phone numbers
  • Users address book contacts
  • Partial payment card numbers
  • Past in-app chats
  • Details about sitting sessions
    • Locations
    • Times

Customers Impacted: 93,000.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/incident-report-no1-babysitter-application-exposure-bob-diachenko/

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/mongodb-server-exposes-babysitting-apps-database/

Australia – Melbourne High School

Exploit: Negligence.
Risk to Small Business: Extreme: This is a major exposure of sensitive and potentially embarrassing information that could irreparably damage a company’s reputation.
Individual Risk: High: Those affected by the data breach have sensitive information about their personal medical information that is considered highly private and could leave them exposed to identity theft.
Melbourne High School: School in Melbourne.
Date Occurred/Discovered: August 20-22, 2018
Date Disclosed: August 22, 2018
Data Compromised:

  • Medical information
  • Mental health conditions
  • Learning behavioral difficulties

Customers Impacted: 300 students.
https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2018/aug/22/melbourne-student-health-records-posted-online-in-appalling-privacy-breach


 


Tick Tock.
The cost of cybercrime is no joke. This is easy to say from the perspective of someone whose business it is to know all about cybercrime trends, attack vectors, and yada, yada, yada.  But to really quantify how big of a problem cybercrime is in the world of business, it is often easier to compare it to day to day things… like a doctor explaining a complicated procedure or a mechanic telling you why your car is making that noise. So today I would like to compare the cost of cybercrime to the most universal understanding that there is… time.

The cost of cybercrime each minute globally: $1,138,888

The number of cybercrime victims each minute globally: 1,861

Number of records leaked globally each minute (from publicly disclosed incidents): 5,518

The number of new phishing domains each minute.21

As you can see, cybercrime buids by the minute.
https://www.darkreading.com/application-security/how-threats-increase-in-internet-time/d/d-id/1332629


This Week in Data Breaches 7/27 to 08/1 2018

Phishing

This week there were a few troubling breaches that stood out, especially the identity theft company LifeLock. When a company deals with sensitive information like the data LifeLock stores, customer trust is paramount…. so, when a breach occurs it really makes one reevaluate the effectiveness of the organization. A U.S. bank was also breached, with customer accounts drained at hundreds of ATMs across the country: a clear sign of a highly organized and effective attack. Bad actors are becoming smarter and getting better at attacking organizations, and the barrier to entry into this career of crime is getting lower and easier.

Thanks to our friends at ID Adgent!

 

Highlights from The Week in Breach:
– Banking Trojan.
– Life-UnLocked!
– Cyber Bank Heist.
– Huge Supply Chain Breach!

In Other News:

This Trojan is Galloping
The increasing popularity of ‘malware as a service,’ which is pre-packaged malware, developed by authors with technical skill and leased to less advanced cybercriminals, has made it easier for cybercriminals to launch advanced attacks on victims across the globe. A top-shelf malware as a service known as Exobot has had its code leaked after the author of the malware sold the banking trojan’s source code to interested parties. Once the source code is sold to enough people, eventually someone posts it publicly or it leaks in other ways. Authors of these ‘service’ malware rarely sell off the source code, that is unless they are finished with the project and moving on to other things. This is concerning in multiple ways, first being that a new more powerful malware may be in the works by the same author, second being that the sophisticated Android banking trojan is now becoming more available to bad actors. Researchers fear that the availability of the source code on underground hacking forums and its inevitable spread across the web will trigger a surge of malicious Android applications. History lends to this conclusion, as the leak of Android banking trojan ‘BankBot’ on the web lowered the barrier of entry into the world of malware and resulted in an explosion of the use of the trojan.
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/source-code-for-exobot-android-banking-trojan-leaked-online/

The Best Test to Fail
Penetration testers are useful for assessing the strength and weaknesses in the cybersecurity of an organization, and according to new research these testers are mostly successful. Penetration testers can gain control over the network in question 67% of the time. The study in question was conducted by Rapid7 and examined organizations across industries and sizes, providing a supple sample size for finding two main points of vulnerabilities. The main vulnerabilities proved to be software and credentials. Software has increasingly been used to infiltrate networked resources, and credentials have always been a route of entry for bad actors. Only 16% of the organizations examined did not have a vulnerability, which is less than last year’s study, where 32% were vulnerability-free.
https://www.darkreading.com/threat-intelligence/new-report-shows-pen-testers-usually-win/d/d-id/1332368

I Ain’t Afraid of No PowerGhost
There is a new cryptocurrency mining malware out in the wild, and instead of using an individual’s devices, this malware has been targeting business PCs and servers. The cryptojacker is fileless, utilizing PowerShell and EternalBlue to spread through a business like a disease. PowerGhost is what researchers have begun calling the malware, and it can start on a single system and then spread to other organizations. As of the writing of This Week in Breach, South America is mainly affected by the cryptojacker, but PowerGhost also has a presence in North America and Europe.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/this-new-cryptomining-malware-targets-business-pcs-and-servers/

Podcasts:
IT Provider Network – The Podcast for Growing IT Service
Know Tech Talks – Hosted by Barb Paluszkiewicz
The Continuum Podcast
Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte
Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)
Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!


Canada – GM, Toyota, Tesla, More – Exposed by Level One Robotics

Exploit: Unprotected server/supply chain vulnerability.
Risk to Small Business: Extreme: A breach of this magnitude and depth would more than likely end a small business due to the extremely sensitive information that was leaked. Most companies would not choose to do business with an organization that leaked their trade secrets.
Individual Risk: Extreme: Passport photos and driver’s license scans of some employees were leaked, which puts them at extreme risk for identity theft.
Level One Robotics: Ontario-based business that provides industrial automation services for automotive suppliers.
Date Occurred/Discovered: July 10, 2018
Date Disclosed: July 23, 2018
Data Compromised:

  • Blueprints
  • Factory schematics
  • Robotic configurations
  • Non-disclosure agreements
  • Employee data
    • Names
    • ID numbers
    • Driver’s license scans
    • Passport scans
    • ID photos
  • Invoices
  • Contracts
  • Price negotiations
  • Insurance policies
  • Customer agreements
  • Banking information for the company
    • Account
    • Routing numbers
    • SWIFT codes

Customers Impacted: Over 100 manufacturing companies.
https://cyware.com/news/trade-secrets-of-gm-toyota-tesla-and-others-from-last-10-years-exposed-in-major-data-leak-d707fe02

United States – LifeLock

Exploit: Lack of website authentication and security.
Risk to Small Business: High: Email addresses were exposed, which allows bad actors to target customers. The exploit also allowed a hacker to unsubscribe from all communication with the company, which could be devastating to small businesses.
Individual Risk: Low: Due diligence with opening phishy emails and being suspect of unexpected emails will go a long way to combat this breach.
LifeLock: Identity theft protection company.
Date Occurred/Discovered: July 2018
Date Disclosed: July 25, 2018
Data Compromised:

  • Email addresses

Customers Impacted: 4.5 Million.
https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/07/lifelock-bug-exposed-millions-of-customer-email-addresses/ 

United States – The National Bank of Blacksburg

Exploit: Phishing.
Risk to Small Business: High: The cybercriminals got away with a great deal of money in this hack. Most small businesses would not be able to stay afloat after a hit like the one detailed here.
Individual Risk: Extreme: The money taken was from customer accounts.
The National Bank of Blacksburg: A banking organization located in Virginia.
Date Occurred/Discovered: May 2016 and January 2017
Date Disclosed: Not disclosed, but discovered when a lawsuit was filed June 28, 2018
Data Compromised:  

  • Was able to disable anti-theft systems
  • $1,833,984 USD

Customers Impacted: Hundreds of customers’ accounts were used to steal money from the bank.
https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/07/hackers-breached-virginia-bank-twice-in-eight-months-stole-2-4m/

United States – COSCO
Exploit: Ransomware.
Risk to Small Business: High: The Company’s email is down, forcing employees to use Yahoo mail to communicate with customers as well as internally.
Individual Risk: Low: Customers of the shipping company are not affected due to the continuing operation of the company, but it may be more difficult to coordinate with them.
COSCO: COSCO is an acronym for China Ocean Shipping Company and is a Chinese state-owned shipping services company. It is the 4th largest shipping company in the world.
Date Occurred/Discovered: July 24, 2018
Date Disclosed: July 25, 2018
Data Compromised: A ransomware attack has taken down their American network. The organization is keeping the breach under wraps, for now, so most details are not disclosed.
Customers Impacted: All the organization’s customers are affected by this attack. The difficulty in contacting the company could disrupt its customers’ business.
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/ransomware-infection-cripples-shipping-giant-coscos-american-network/

http://lines.coscoshipping.com/home/News/detail/15325081261286611042/50000000000000231?id=50000000000000231

United States – Blue Spring Family Care

Exploit: Ransomware.
Risk to Small Business: High: Ransomware would be highly disruptive to any sized business.
Individual Risk: Moderate: There is no indication that any customer’s data was exfiltrated.
Blue Spring Family Care: Family healthcare provider.
Date Occurred/Discovered: May 12, 2018
Date Disclosed: July 26, 2018
Data Compromised: Ransomware attack encrypted the organization’s data. The extent of the attack is not clearly defined.
Customers Impacted: 44,979
https://www.databreaches.net/mo-blue-springs-family-care-notifies-44979-patients-after-ransomware-attack/



Supply Pain.
Supply chain attacks are extremely prevalent and costly, and most organizations are not prepared for them. A recent study found that less than 40% of organizations in the US, UK and Singapore have properly vetted their suppliers in the last year. Two-thirds of organizations have suffered a supply chain breach within the same time-frame, and almost three quarters (71%) don’t require the same level of security from their suppliers as they do internally. With the global average cost of a supply chain breach at $1.1 million, do you want to take those odds?https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/two-thirds-of-organizations-hit-in-supply-chain-attacks-/d/d-id/1332352

 

Want to see if you are compromised? Get a free Live Search Dark Web Scan for your business domain!

 

The Week in Breach 07/09/2018 to 07/18/2018

The Week in Breach

This week there was a TON of attention in the media about dark web markets and what’s bought and sold in these shady marketplaces. Timehop, a social media nostalgia app was breached exposing the PII of at least 21 million individuals, due to lack of 2FA, while Macy’s was hit with a breach where credit card data was accessed.

 Highlights from The Week in Breach:

– Pedal to the metal! Gas stolen in hack.
– Tracking military workouts!
– Macy’s falls victim to a breach.
– Timehop wishes it could turn back time for more security!

In Other News:

Dead Men Do Tell Tales
Hackers on the Dark Web have always sold medical records, as they are valued much higher than credit card info or PII. Researchers found this week that bad actors in these dark corners of the web are also selling medical records of deceased patients, with one vendor claiming to have 60,000 available for purchase. The records for sale include name, SSN, Address, zip code, phone number, birthday, sex, insurance and even date of death. What ever happened to respecting the dead?
https://threatpost.com/deceased-patient-data-being-sold-on-dark-web/133871/

Classified Documents for $200
The U.S. military can’t escape the Dark Web either! A lot of military documents have turned up on dark web markets after a hacker, with only a moderate level of technical skill, was able to access a captain’s computer through a previously-disclosed FTP vulnerability. Some of the documents are classified, and all of them contain sensitive data about military tactics or hardware. One of the documents is a maintenance book for the MQ-9 Reaper drone which is regarded as one of the deadliest drones used by the United States. How much money will classified U.S. military documents fetch on the Dark Web? $200. That says a lot about how much information is available for criminals to buy.
https://www.theverge.com/2018/7/10/17555982/hacker-caught-selling-stolen-air-force-drone-manual-dark-web

A $10 Key into Your Network
Remote access to IT systems is a competitive market on the Dark Web, with some running an interest to criminals for as low as $10! Some of these forums have tens of thousands of compromised systems available for bad actors to choose from, across all versions of Windows and at places such as international airports, hospitals and governments. One international airport found on the site had the administrator account exposed, as well as accounts associated with the companies that provide camera surveillance and building security. That’s not a good look!
https://www.zdnet.com/article/hackers-are-selling-backdoors-into-pcs-for-just-10/

Gassed Up
This week in Detroit, two suspects managed to steal over 600 gallons of gasoline after hacking the gas pump. The fuel is worth about $1,800 and was taken in broad daylight over the course of 90 minutes. At least 10 cars benefited from the hack and the police are at a complete loss on who conducted the hack. The hacker or hackers used a remote device that was able to alter the price of the gas and lock out the clerk from being able to shut off the affected pump. With gas prices being so high, it’s likely that attacks like this will continue in the future.
https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/men-hack-into-pump-at-detroit-gas-station-steal-600-gallons-of-gas_

Fitness App Turned Finder App
A fitness tracking app hailing from Finland has disabled their global activity map after it was revealed it could be used to track the geolocation of military personnel. The map showed the biking and running routes of its users, but also included the usernames of each person, allowing one to cross-reference the username with other websites and possibly identify the person’s name. Using the map, one could see where the person jogged around their home address and around the military base; possibly even bases that are secret to foreign countries.
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/technology/polar-app-disables-feature-that-allowed-journalists-to-identify-intelligence-personnel/

Sex Appall
A twist on a classic email scam has appeared this week, with the classic ‘sextortion’ scam getting an upgrade. Now rather than just an intimidation email where targeted parties pay up out of fear of friends and family finding out what they do privately, the email also includes a password. The password appears to be from a large or multiple large data breaches, but these data breaches appear to be fairly old. Those who reported receiving the email claimed that the passwords were correct… ten years ago. While the passwords are outdated in many cases, this likely indicates that we will see more complex versions of this scam appearing in the near future.
https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/07/sextortion-scam-uses-recipients-hacked-passwords/#more-44406

Podcasts:

Know Tech Talks – Hosted by Barb Paluszkiewicz
The Continuum Podcast
Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte
Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)
Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!


United States – Macy’s

Exploit: Supply chain exploit.
Risk to Small Business: High: A bad actor accessing names and card information can severely damage consumer trust in a brand.
Individual Risk: High: Individuals affected by this breach are at high risk of their credit card details being sold on the Dark Web.
Macy’s: Large department store chain.
Date Occurred/Discovered: April 26 – June, 2018
Date Disclosed: July, 2018
Data Compromised:

  • Full name
  • Address
  • Phone number
  • Email address
  • Date of birth
  • Debit/ credit card numbers
  • Expiration dates

Customers Impacted: Unclear but the hacker operated undetected for almost 2 months.
https://cyware.com/category/breaches-and-incidents-news

United States – Timehop

Exploit: Lack of 2FA on cloud infrastructure.
Risk to Small Business: High: All of Timehop’s customers were a part of this breach, which discredits the organization and could have long-lasting effects on the business.
Individual Risk: Moderate: The credentials stolen could be used to compromise other accounts.
Timehop: Social media aggregation site that allows users to see posts made in the past.
Date Occurred/Discovered: July 4, 2018
Date Disclosed: July 8, 2018
Data Compromised:        

  • Names
  • Email addresses
  • Phone numbers
  • Date of birth
  • Gender

Customers Impacted: 21 Million.
https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/timehop-breach-hits-21-million/
https://www.timehop.com/security
https://techcrunch.com/2018/07/11/timehop-data-breach/

United States – Cass Regional Medical Center

Exploit: Ransomware.
Risk to Small Business: High: A ransomware attack on any business in any sector would greatly diminish the organization’s ability to operate as needed. In some ransomware cases the data encrypted is lost entirely.
Individual Risk: Moderate: At this point in time there is no evidence that the data affected was also exfiltrated.
Cass Regional Medical Center: Missouri based medical center.
Date Occurred/Discovered: July 9, 2018
Date Disclosed: July 9, 2018
Data Compromised: The medical center’s internal communications system and access to their electronic health record system were affected by the hack, but there is no public indication that patient data has been accessed.
Customers Impacted: Many details surrounding the attack are being withheld from the public at this time, but restoration of the affected systems were at 50% as of July 10, 2018.
https://cyware.com/news/missouris-cass-regional-medical-center-hit-with-ransomware-attack-92884b12

Germany – DomainFactory

Exploit: Dirty cow vulnerability. (this is a nine-year-old critical vulnerability has been discovered in virtually all versions of the Linux operating system and is actively being exploited in the wild)
Risk to Small Business: High: A breach including banking account numbers would heavily damage the reputation of a small business.
Individual Risk: High: A wealth of PII was accessed during this breach and could leave individuals vulnerable to account takeover or identity theft.
DomainFactory: Web hosting service based in Ismaning.
Date Occurred/Discovered: July 6, 2018
Date Disclosed: July 9, 2018
Data Compromised:

  • Names
  • Addresses
  • Phone numbers
  • DomainFactory passwords
  • Dates of birth
  • Bank names/ account numbers
  • Schufa scores

Customers Impacted: The amount of customers impacted has not been made publicly available.
 https://www.zdnet.com/article/user-data-exposed-in-domain-factory-hosting-security-breach/
https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/unauthorized-party-accessed/


 Did you know?

The cost of a breach
A recent study conducted by IBM provides some context to the same old story that you hear in the news of big bad breaches and how scary they are for your business. The Cost of a Data Breach Study by Ponemon* puts numbers to these stories and provides a wealth of analysis so even someone who has never used a computer before can quantify the seriousness of a breach… as long as they are familiar with money.

The average cost of a breach increased this year by 6.4%, with the per capita cost rising less, but only barely, by 4.8% (page 3). The cost of a data breach varies greatly by country, with the United States average breach price coming in at $7.91 Million and per capita costing $233. Canada’s per capita cost is the second highest out of the nations surveyed at $202 per record, and their average price of a breach is $4.74 million. Australia’s cost of a breach is less than the US and Canada, but Aussies are far from getting off free. The average cost of a breach down under is $1.99 million and the per capita cost averages at $108 (page 13).

The study also explored the main factors that were found to affect the cost of a breach, stating 5 major contributing factors that could make the difference between a manageable breach vs a mega breach. The loss of customers following a breach, the size of the data breach, the time it takes to identify and contain a breach, management of detection costs and management of the costs following a breach are the factors that most contribute to the cost of a breach (page 7). The time it takes to identify a breach being a major contributing factor to the cost of a breach is particularly important due to the fact that organizations saw an increased time to identify a breach this year. This can be contributed to the ever-increasing severity of malicious attacks companies face and highlight the need for proactive monitoring for breaches, as well as a serious focus on cybersecurity on a management level. That’s why tools such as Dark Web ID™ that dredge the Dark Web for personal information and credentials can contribute greatly to decreasing the cost of a breach. Organizations that identified breaches within 100 days saved more than $1 Million (page 9) compared to companies who did not. That says a lot because after all… money talks.

*Source: Ponemon Cost of Breach Study 2018

New Cybersecurity Regulations on Horizon for Corporate America

Image result for horizon

 

Prime Telecommunications, Inc., a leading managed technology services provider, is helping small to mid-sized businesses (SMBs) navigate the recent changes in cybersecurity standards that are highly likely to affect American businesses. Many have heard about Facebook’s recent controversy around Cambridge Analytica and irresponsible data sharing policies. Marc Zuckerburg even testified in front of the EU in order to address these major concerns and the result has been the passing and implementation of the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation), which took effect in Europe in late May.

This new regulation demands transparency and responsible data practices on the behalf of all companies that do business in the EU. Some examples of GDPR in effect are 1) Requiring all subscribers to opt-in again to receiving all newsletters/marketing emails/etc. and 2) Companies need to report any major data breaches to all of their customers within 72 hours of the breach occurring. There are many more components to the regulation, however, the penalties for not adhering to these standards are in the millions.

This standard is very likely to reach the US marketplace and for most companies, this standard is already affecting their businesses. For example, if a business has any suppliers, customers, or satellite offices in countries located within the EU, they need to take a serious look at their data practices and make sure they are compliant. In time, many experts expect GDPR or some derivation of it to affect US-based businesses. “We strongly believe data regulation is coming to the US marketplace it’s certain that some form of cybersecurity regulation is imminent and severe penalties will follow businesses that aren’t compliant,” stated Vic Levinson, President of Prime Telecommunications. “There’s simply been too many data breaches that have affected major companies like Dropbox and Target for regulation not to come. When it does Prime Telecommunications’ proven cyber security program will play a major role in helping our customers meet these new regulations,” added Mr. Levinson.

Cybersecurity has transitioned from the era where an enterprise could “play dumb,” expect a slap on the wrist, pay minor fines and resume business as usual. Cybersecurity is now a central pillar of any organization’s success or demise and with the stakes as high as they are now, SMBs need to address their data policies and practices immediately.

While most business owners dread the idea of spending time, energy and money on meeting a new compliance, the simultaneous opportunity is for businesses to leverage the expertise of Prime Telecommunications to lower their operating costs through the deployment of advanced technology to offset the new investments in cybersecurity that they will likely be required to make. Whether the organization is large or small, soaring or declining, it’s time to revisit cybersecurity policies today.

The Week in Breach: 07/02/18 – 0706/18

 

While it has been a slow week in terms of the number of breaches, the severity of the breaches that did occur this week is nothing short of disturbing. The information exposed on the open web by ALERRT could be used with far-reaching effects…including both physical and permanent consequences. A cyber-attack conducted against a small business hosting provider in Australia also highlights a “WORST case” scenario for a breach. I strongly encourage everyone to check out their website here for a sobering reminder of what a company crippled by a breach looks like. When you cannot contact your customers to tell them that you have been breached, because you don’t even have a complete list of who your customers are… well, this is a good example of how damaging a breach can be.

In other news…

  • GDPR is inspiring others around the globe to enhance privacy and breach notification laws!
  • Hey T-Mobile Customers, are your photos safe?
  • Big Brother aka “Google” is exposing us again!
  • Privacy and Breach Notification laws are spreading globally

California has enacted a law similar to GDPR. This statute is widely regarded as one of the strongest privacy laws in the country and goes into effect in 2020, giving those who do business in the state some time to prepare for the change. The bill assures that organizations have to tell a consumer if their data is being collected, who it will be shared with, and the business purpose for collecting personal data.
https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/californias-new-privacy-law-gives-gdpr-compliant-orgs-little-to-fear/d/d-id/1332217

Cali is not the only place that was inspired by the implementation of GDPR. Brazil has passed a data protection bill in early June that if made into law, would prevent organizations from collecting and processing Brazilians’ data without informing users. Breaches are also covered by the bill, which requires organizations to report breaches immediately with fines up to 4% of revenue for those who don’t comply.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/brazil-moves-forward-with-online-data-protection-efforts/

Hello… Photos.
Those who have Samsung phones should be careful what they keep in their photo gallery! There are reports of Galaxy users having their photos sent to random contacts without their knowledge. This bug seems to only affect T- mobile users, but it is probably best to lean on the side of caution, considering the ramifications of sending the wrong photo to the wrong person.

https://techcrunch.com/2018/07/02/some-samsung-users-say-their-phones-randomly-sent-photos-to-contacts/

Gmail has its eye on you!
Google has been allowing third parties to read through people’s inboxes, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. While the creator of Gmail has promised to stop scanning emails on their platform to curate ads, the organization has been allowing third parties to access inboxes if the user has opted into email-based tools like travel itinerary planners. These third parties are not just using AI to snoop through messages either…oftentimes employees of the organization go digging for information themselves.
https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/security/google-reportedly-allowed-outside-app-developers-read-user-emails-despite-n888571

Podcasts:
Know Tech Talks – Hosted by Barb Paluszkiewicz
The Continuum Podcast
Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte
Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)
Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!


Australia – Cyanweb Solutions – Total Devastation Event

Exploit: DDos Attack, Web server compromise, data encryption/ ransomware & data destruction.

Risk to Small Business: Extreme/Total Devastation: This is a catastrophic event impacting Cyanweb and its 400 customers that relied on them for web hosting.

Risk to Exploited Individuals: Extreme/ Total Devastation: This breach may devastate the businesses that relied on Cyanweb. This will also impact those businesses downstream customers and the employees of the impacted businesses. The goal was maximum data loss/ total devastation.

Cyanweb Solutions: Digital marketing and web provider based in Perth.

Date Occurred/Discovered: June 27th, 2018

Date Disclosed: July, 2018

Data Compromised: Only 12% of customer data survived the attack. 1200- 2500 man hours of work between the 3 employees is estimated for a full recovery.

How it was compromised: A ‘professional’ group distracted the admin with a DDoS attack while simultaneously infiltrating the server and delivering a ‘seek and destroy’ payload.

Customers Impacted: 435 accounts.
https://www.crn.com.au/news/perth-web-hosting-provider-cyanweb-solutions-hit-by-criminal-hacking-data-and-backups-lost-496455
https://www.cyanweb.com.au/

United States – ALERRT

Exploit: Negligence (no password required to access web server.)

Risk to Small Business: High: A breach that is a result of negligence dramatically reduces confidence in the company by consumers.

Risk to Exploited Individuals: Extreme: Compromised PII, password and correspondence that can be used to target and exploit individuals including law enforcement.

ALERRT: A federally funded active shooter training center for law enforcement.

Date Occurred/Discovered: June 2018

Date Disclosed: June 2018

Data Compromised:  

  • Work contact information
  • Personal email addresses
  • Work addresses
  • Cell numbers
  • Who has taken ALERRT courses, with feedback
  • Full name of those who took the course
  • Zip code
  • Histories on instructors
  • Instructors skills and training
  • Names of instructors
  • Geolocations of:
    • Schools
    • Courts
    • Police departments
    • City halls
    • Places where people gather such as universities and malls
  • Officers home addresses
  • 85,000 emails between staff and trainees dating back to 2011 including:
    • Password reset emails
    • Names
    • Email addresses
    • Phone numbers
    • The courses taken
    • When the courses were offered
  • Highly sensitive information about weaknesses in response ability

Customers Impacted: 65,000 officers, but this information could be harmful to anyone in the U.S. given how it could be used by domestic terrorists or other bad actors.
https://www.zdnet.com/article/a-massive-cache-of-law-enforcement-personnel-data-has-leaked/

UK – National Health Service

Exploit: Coding error/ misconfiguration leading to privacy violation.

Risk to Small Business: High: A breach of this size that essentially mislead those who specifically requested for their health information to be kept private would shake the trust of any customer. Privacy laws, including the EU’s GDPR, will impose harsh fines and penalties for similar incidents moving forward.

Risk to Exploited Individuals: Lowthe data was exposed externally and picked up by hackers.

National Health Service: The public health services in the United Kingdom.

Date Occurred/Discovered: March 2015 – June 2018

Date Disclosed: July 2nd, 2018

Data Compromised: 

  • Health Data

How it was compromised: A supplier defect that did not properly indicate that the patient’s data was to be only used for medical treatment.

Customers Impacted: 150,000
https://cyware.com/news/nhs-data-breach-exposing-150000-patients-sensitive-health-details-blamed-on-coding-error-40aa0ccf

https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2018-07-02/HCWS813/


Often times there is no “why”, just a “because”!

The Cyanweb Solutions breach was well organized and a caused catastrophic damage to both Cyanweb and the hundreds of customers that replied on them for hosting support. It’s nearly impossible to quantify the overall financial impact that this breach has caused.

When conducting post-breach forensics, the first question often asked is “why” – what was their motivation to destroy this small business? Often times, the answer is “because they could”.  The group conducted this takedown overwhelmed Cyanweb with a massive DDos attack, and while distracted, they compromised the servers, escalated their access, encrypted user data and proceeded to destroy almost everything – including backups. It did not take long for Cyanweb to discover the attack, but by the time they did, 88% of their data was permanently deleted.

This attack demonstrates how quick and devastating an attack can be on a small business.  Cyanweb was a trusted provider to hundreds of organizations, yet they lacked the proper security controls to secure their customer’s data, thus breaching their fiduciary responsibility. Whether we like it or not, we have to proactively invest in cybersecurity solutions to protect the continuity of our business and ensure those that count on us are secured.

Regardless of the size of your business or the industry we’re in, we’re all targets.

This week in Breaches!

full frame shot of abstract pattern

Photo by Sabrina Gelbart on Pexels.com

 

This week shows no shortage of targeted attacks designed to extract large datasets from a broad range of consumer sites.  Travel, finance and entertainment sites were targeted, impacting more than 100,000,000 unsuspecting victims.  If anything, this week clearly demonstrates why individuals need to proactively monitor for their compromised data with tools like our SpotLight ID – Personal Identity & Credit Monitoring Solutions.  The events of this week also clearly demonstrate why businesses must monitor for compromised credentials that can be used to exploit internal systems and to compromise or takeover customer accounts.

Highlights:

  • Leaked credentials from a 3rd party data breach used to exploit 45,000 Transamerica customers 
  • No Tickets for You! – TicketFly shuts down to identify and fix the source of leak impacting 26M customers
  • Booking.com shows that phishing attacks never take a vacation
  • Google Groups – taking a page right out of Amazon’s leaky bucket playbook?

In other news…

The City of Atlanta’s losing streak continues thanks to ransomware hacks! This time, the city’s evidence chain of custody breached, allowing police evidence to be destroyed – impacting investigations and prosecutions.
https://cyware.com/news/atlanta-ransomware-attack-destroyed-years-of-police-dashcam-footage-potentially-critical-evidence-9e8134ac

Europol has a new team dedicated to cybercrime on the Dark Web, hoping to monitor and mitigate criminal activity. Multiple law enforcement agencies throughout Europe are participating in this team, in addition to some non-European organizations. Keep fighting the good fight!
https://www.welivesecurity.com/2018/06/01/europol-eu-team-fight-dark-web/

Google Groups can’t get its act together when it comes to privacy settings, resulting in accidental disclosure of users’ private documents. If your business uses Google Groups, make sure to set your group to private!
https://www.securityweek.com/thousands-organizations-expose-sensitive-data-google-groups

It looks like there’s more than just gators to watch out for in the sunshine state… Florida named the worse state in consumer cybersecurity.

https://www.darkreading.com/vulnerabilities—threats/survey-shows-florida-at-the-bottom-for-consumer-cybersecurity/d/d-id/1331983


 What we’re STILL listening to this week!

Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte

Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)

Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!

TicketFly

Exploit: Database misconfiguration, hacker doxing/ransoming

Risk to Small Business: High: Demonstrates the impact of database misconfiguration and security controls.
Risk to Exploited Individuals: High: Social engineering and identity theft as a large amount of personal information including names, addresses and phone numbers of customers were leaked.
TicketFly: Owned by Eventbrite, TicketFly is a popular site where customers can purchase tickets online for upcoming events and shows.

Date Occurred
Discovered
May 30, 2018
Date Disclosed TicketFly made an official statement on June 6, 2018
Data Compromised Email addresses, Phone Number, Billing Address and Home Addresses
How it was Compromised A hacker attempted to contact the company about a vulnerability, demanding 1 Bitcoin as ransom to reveal the weakness. The hacker claims the emails to the company went unanswered so the cybercriminal vandalized the TicketFly site and leaked some of the information acquired to the press.
Customers Impacted
26 million, and even more if you consider the customers who are unable to buy tickets while the site has been down.
Attribution/Vulnerability Undisclosed at this time.

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/ticketfly-breach-may-have-exposed-data-of-26-million-customers-2018-06-03

MyHeritage

Exploit: Unsecured/misconfigured data store. Poor data at rest encryption. Poor password encryption.
Risk to Small Business: High: Demonstrates the impact of database misconfiguration, security controls and weak encryption.
Risk to Exploited Individuals: Moderate: Email addresses leaked but DNA/family history data supposedly stored separately.
MyHeritage: Users search historical records and create a family tree using this web-based service from Israel.

Date Occurred
Discovered
October 26, 2017
Date Disclosed June 4, 2018
Data Compromised
All email addresses and hashed passwords of users up to October 26, 2017
How it was Compromised
The CISO of MyHeritage received a message from a researcher that he had found a great deal of MyHeritage’s data on a server not connected with the site. The CISO confirmed that the data originated from their site but exactly how the data was acquired is not clear as of now.
Customers Impacted
92,283,889 Users
Attribution/Vulnerability Unclear, but MyHeritage did not store passwords, instead of storing a one-way hash of each password that has a key unique to each user. All credit card information is located on third party sites and the most sensitive information the website holds such as family tree and DNA data is stored in segregated systems with additional layers of security.

https://blog.myheritage.com/2018/06/myheritage-statement-about-a-cybersecurity-incident/#

https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/vbqyvx/myheritage-hacked-data-breach-92-million

Transamerica
Exploit:  Compromised credentials
Risk to Small Business: High: Demonstrates the need to proactively monitor for compromised credentials from 3rd party data breaches and phishing attack mitigation.
Risk to Exploited IndividualsHigh: Highly sensitive personal information was stolen and could be used to impersonate an employee; or an outside agent could pose as a relative of an employee to phish for information

Transamerica: This company offers mutual funds, retirement strategies, insurance, and annuities.

Date Occurred
Discovered
Between March 2017 and January 2018
Date Disclosed May 2018
Data Compromised
Names, Addresses, Social Security Numbers, DOB, Financial data And Employment Information
How it was Compromised Third party compromised credentials were used to access user’s account data
Attribution/Vulnerability Outside actor

https://cyware.com/news/transamerica-hacked-nearly-45000-retirees-personal-and-sensitive-details-stolen-c2c419f5

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/06/05/transamerica_retirement_plan_hack/

Booking. com
Exploit: Phishing

Risk to Small Business Risk: High: Demonstrates how well-crafted phishing attacks can lead to massive data loss even with strong end-user security awareness training program and security tools in place.

Risk to Exploited Individuals: High: Money was stolen from the individuals who responded to the convincing email, and their stolen personal information could be used again.

Booking. com: A popular site for booking hotels, houses, apartments and boats.

Date Occurred
Discovered
June 2018
Date Disclosed June 3, 2018
Data Compromised Names, Addresses, Phone Numbers, Dates, Price of bookings and Reference Numbers
How it was Compromised
Certain properties of Booking.com received a link that detailed a security breach and urged them to change their password. Once the link was clicked the hackers had access to booking information that they used to send highly convincing phishing emails to customers asking for advance payments. The emails contained booking and pricing info for previously booked rooms, making the emails almost indistinguishable from an actual email from the company. The company reported that there was no compromise on their systems and that any customers who lost money due to the incident will be reimbursed.
Attribution/Vulnerability Outside actors, deployed through spam email campaign

https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/travel-website-hackers-cyber-crime-phishing-holidays-a8382771.html

https://www.thesun.co.uk/money/6437309/hackers-target-booking-steal-thousands/

https://www.scmagazine.com/cybercriminals-phish-bookingcom-customers-after-possibly-breaching-partner-hotels/article/771091/

PageUp
Exploit: Malware
Risk to Small Business Risk: High: Demonstrates that malware exploits are often very difficult to detect and defend against.

Risk to Exploited Individuals: High: It is unclear what information has been compromised and from which customers of PageUp, but given the nature of the company and the information they store, the risk is serious.

PageUp: A large Australian company that provides HR, career, and recruitment service to large and small businesses around the world.

Date Occurred
Discovered
May 23, 2018
Date Disclosed June 6, 2018
Data Compromised Unclear, but passwords were hashed and salted
How it was Compromised
The investigation into the breach is ongoing, but due to the new implementation of GDPR in Europe and Australia’s Notifiable Data Breaches Scheme, PageUp disclosed the breach in compliance with the laws.
Attribution/Vulnerability Malware was found on one of PageUp’s IT systems, but how the malware entered the system is still being investigated

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/malware-infection-at-hr-company-triggers-flurry-of-data-breach-notifications/


An important takeaway from this week finds its origin in research done by Dr. Michael McGuire, funded by Bromium and titled ‘The Web of Profit’ : The unfortunate truth is that crime does pay.Cybercrime produces 1.5 Trillion each year, which rivals Russia’s GDP and would place cybercrime at number 13 in a comparison of the world’s highest gross domestic product. $500 Billion of that can be contributed to intellectual property theft and data trading accounts for $160 Billion.

The scope of cybercrime profits and influence points to the conclusion that it is an economy in and of itself, a conclusion that is supported by the growth of platform criminality. Platform criminality is much like the business models of platform businesses such as Google, Uber, or Amazon that trade in data. Data is a profitable business as demonstrated by these famous companies (or at least two of them), and criminals have taken note.

Using the Dark Web as a means of facilitating transactions, cyber criminals are able to buy and sell anything from data to a day-zero exploit. The main takeaway from looking at how cybercrime has evolved is that cyber criminals are selling crime rather than committing it. Much like how Uber is selling a platform where drivers are paired with passengers, criminals are selling the tools and data needed to commit cybercrimes over ‘back alley’ marketplaces.

The research done by Dr. McGuire also highlights the importance of monitoring the Dark Web for personal information, stating:

New kinds of software tools are required for uncovering how cybercriminals are using digital technologies for hiding and laundering revenues. One example would be virtualization tools that can generate safe havens, isolated from the internet, where illicit revenue-generating activity can be diverted and neutralized. Another would be more sophisticated scanning tools capable of better tracking and locating items of value across the net – in particular, personal data”(125).

The Dr. also concluded that while Dark Web monitoring is vital to combatting the economy of cybercrime, it is far from an easy task. The difficult nature of monitoring the Dark Web is not just because it is harder to navigate than the traditional web… explains McGuire, it is “because many of the sites only grant access by word of mouth, or on the basis of ratings status and trust, which may take some time to build up” (57). The Dark Web and the economy surrounding it is nothing to take lightly, and ignoring its existence only adds to the ability for cyber criminals to go about their work unscathed. Dark Web ID by ID Agent fulfills this need for Dark Web monitoring, instead of turning a blind eye to the complex and dynamic reality of the cybercrime economy our services dive right in.

https://learn.bromium.com/rprt-web-of-profit.html

https://www.darkreading.com/cloud/cybercrime-is-skyrocketing-as-the-world-goes-digital/a/d-id/1331905

Highlights from The Week in Breach: May 30 to June 6 2018

Highlights from The Week in Breach:

– Finance sector attacks ramping up
– BackSwap JavaScript injections effectively circumventing detection
– Honda has leaky buckets too

This week in breach has all been about money, money, money. The finance sector is getting pelted with attacks recently – even more than usual – and Mexico, Canada, and Poland have been hit the worst.

In other news…

North Korea is still up to their old tricks, targeting South Korean websites with advanced zero-day attacks.
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/activex-zero-day-discovered-in-recent-north-korean-hacks/

School is letting out which means grade changing breaches are in season! Two students at Bloomfield Hills High School attempted to fudge their report card and refund lunches for themselves and 20 other students.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/leemathews/2018/05/22/school-hackers-changed-grades-and-tried-to-get-a-free-lunch/#478b6d026e7d

The government of Idaho was hacked 2 times in 3 days which is not a very good look.
https://idahobusinessreview.com/2018/05/22/state-government-hacked-twice-in-three-days/

Coca-Cola had a breach that compromised 8,000 employees’ personal data, but they are also providing identity monitoring for a year at no cost. Ahh… refreshing, isn’t it?
https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/no-smiles-for-cocacola-after-data/


 What we’re STILL listening to this week!

Security Now – Hosted by Steve Gibson, Leo Laporte

Defensive Security Podcast – Hosted by Jerry Bell (@maliciouslink) and Andrew Kalat (@lerg)

Small Business, Big Marketing – Australia’s #1 Marketing Show!

Simplii Financial (CIBC) & Bank of Montreal
Exploit: Spear Phishing
Type of Exploit Risk to Small Business:  High: Personal and account information from a large number of customers were compromised, opening up the possibility of identity theft for business owners or employees.

Risk to Exploited Individuals: High: A large number of both personal and account information was breached from both banks including social insurance numbers and account balances. 

Simplii Financial: Owned by CIBC, Simplii Financial is a Canadian banking institution offering a wide array of services for their customers such as mortgages and investing.

BMO (Bank of Montreal): BMO is also a Canadian banking institution that offers investing, financial planning, personal accounts, and mortgages.

Date Occurred/
Discovered
The weekend of the 25th
Date Disclosed May 28, 2018
Data Compromised Personal and account information of the two bank’s customers. The hackers provided a sample of the breached data, containing the names, dates of birth, social insurance number and account balances of two customers.
How it was Compromised It is believed that both bank data breaches have been carried out by the same group of fraudsters, due to the time frame and ‘blackmail’ strategy of the group rather than selling of the data. It is suspected that a spear phishing attack was used, focusing on individual employees with targeted phishing attempts rather than a ‘dragnet’ approach typically seen in phishing attacks.
Customers Impacted
Between the two banks over 90,000 people’s personal and account information was compromised during the breach. CIBC owned Simplii Financial reported 40,000 accounts compromised compared to BMO who declared 50,000 accounts compromised later on the same day.
Attribution/Vulnerability Undisclosed at this time.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/simplii-data-hack-1.4680575

Honda Car India
Exploit: Misconfigured/ Insecure Amazon S3 buckets
Type of Exploit Risk to Small Business: High
Risk to Exploited Individuals: Moderate: Presumably low-risk PII and vehicle information exposed.
Honda Car India: Honda is an international cooperation from Japan that specializes in cars, planes, motorcycles and power equipment.

Date Occurred/
Discovered
The details were left exposed for at least three months. A security researcher who was scanning the web for unsecured servers left a message of warning timestamped February 28.
Date Disclosed May 30 2018
Data Compromised
Names
User gender
Phone numbers for both users and their trusted contacts
Email addresses for both users and their trusted contacts
Account passwords
Car VIN
Car Connect IDs, and more
How it was Compromised
A researcher who was scanning the web for AWS S3 buckets with incorrect permissions left a message in Honda Car India’s server to try and warn them to secure their server. Honda was not even aware that the note was added, signaling a complete lack of monitoring on the companies part.
Customers Impacted
50,000 of Honda Car India’s customers have had their personal info exposed on the internet for three months at the minimum.
Attribution/Vulnerability Negligence. Once the researcher noticed that Honda had still not secured their buckets, he reached out to them but it still took the company 2 weeks to respond.

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/honda-india-left-details-of-50-000-customers-exposed-on-an-aws-s3-server/

SPEI
Exploit: Man in the Middle Attack
Type of Exploit Risk to Small Business: Severe: Security certificate exploit, website login spoofing, traffic re-direct. Significant financial loss. Threat intelligence/ data share fail.
Risk to Exploited IndividualsLow:  Financial Institutions will absorb the loss.

SPEI: Mexican domestic payment system.

Date Occurred/
Discovered
A breach was first detected on April 17th, with 5 more financial institutions being breached on April 24th, 26th, and May 8th.
Date Disclosed May 2018
Data Compromised
$15 Million stolen
How it was Compromised The central bank of Mexico experienced a man in the middle attack in April that it was able to stop, but failed to warn other financial institutions in the country about the severity of the incident. This led to 5 other financial institutions being compromised except the attacks were successful. It is unclear exactly how the hackers were able to enter the network, but the situation is constantly developing.
Attribution/Vulnerability Outside actors/ not disclosing breach possibly facilitated more breaches.
Customers Impacted Multiple financial institutions in Mexico

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-05-29/mexico-foiled-a-110-million-bank-heist-then-kept-it-a-secret

Polish Banks
Exploit: JavaScript malware injection named BackSwap
Type of Exploit Risk to Small Business: High: Sophisticated JavaScript injection designed to bypass advanced security/ injection detection.
Risk to Exploited Individuals: High: those who used the polish banks targeted by the new malware will take a financial loss, 2FA does not combat this.

Polish Banks: 5 Polish banks are being targeted

Date Occurred/
Discovered
The banking malware was first introduced in March 2018. The malware has been increasingly active since then.
Date Disclosed May 2018
Data Compromised Banking account information and funds
How it was Compromised
A new malware family. This family of banking malware uses an unfortunately elegant solution to bypass traditional security measures, using Windows message loop events rather than process injection methods to monitor browsing activity. When an infected user begins banking activities, the malware injects malicious JavaScript directly into the address bar. The script hides the change in recipient by replacing the input field with a fake one displaying the intended destination.
Attribution/Vulnerability Outside actors, deployed through spam email campaign

https://www.welivesecurity.com/2018/05/25/backswap-malware-empty-bank-accounts/

The last couple of months has seen an increase in the number of attacks on financial institutions around the world. Both the Bank Negara Malaysia and Bancomext were targeted in SWIFT-related attacks while two Canadian banks’ data was held at ransom in a massive breach. The largest three banks in the Netherlands were hit by DDoS attacks, the Swiss Financial Market Supervisory Authority stated that cyber-attacks were the greatest threat to their banks, while at the same time British banks spending on fighting financial crime sits at 5 billion pounds.

While no sector is immune from cyber-attack, the nature of the financial industry makes an attractive target. The sector is made up of institutions that store large quantities of sensitive data that can be sold on the Dark Web, as well as institutions that have access to large sums of capitol.

Additional Sources:
https://www.hstoday.us/uncategorized/cyber-attacks-on-banking-infrastructure-increase/