Learning how to Create Use Cases for Video Conferencing

I sat at my computer yesterday with my cloud video conferencing mentor, Dan Marchetto from Iocom. We were talking about the best ways to implement cloud video conferencing in organizations. It comes down to the “use case” more than the technology. A “use case” is just that- what are you going to do with the service once you get it. Think of it as a compelling “Why?” or “What are we seeking to do with the technology? What need does fulfill for us?”. Each organization has different needs- generally based upon industry. Therefore, you can look within your work flows specific to what you do and where you do it to look for efficiencies. I thought this was logical and fascinating. Being the web researcher I am, I immediately set to work to explore this further. I found a great paper from Frost and Sullivan from 2009 that describes this. Here is an excerpt from what they wrote: (five years later, still very relevant)

Use Cases for Videoconferencing

The best way to derive value from any technology is to use it in places where it will make the biggest difference within the organization. Videoconferencing is no exception. There are many key use cases for the technology— areas of business where using it will significantly reduce costs and/or increase productivity. Let’s look at a few of them in step two of our five-step process:

 

  • Training is a clear case where videoconferencing can save companies money, and their employees times and By using video to train everyone from salespeople to support staff to every employee who needs information on benefits and enrollment, companies can save money on travel and facilities costs for the attendees and trainers. They can also limit the time people spend in training to the event itself, meaning that a three-hour training session will take three hours, not 12 (or more, is flying is involved). That, of course, allows attendees to go back to their day jobs that much sooner. Using videoconferencing for training also allows benefits the trainers, who no longer need to fly around the country (or the globe) to teach. That ensures they can spend more time on prep and follow-up, and reach more people in the same amount of time. With videoconferencing, who gets trained doesn’t have to be determined by location and costs; now, everyone who could benefit from training can get it, without leaving the office.

 

  • Employee and recruiting interviews can be held via videoconferencing, allowing companies to reach out to more candidates, since location no longer Also, those candidates can speak with more people within the organization, without incurring travel costs for them or the interviewers.

 

  • Product development teams benefit from videoconferencing in two ways: The technology allows them to communicate and collaborate better, since video lets participants read body language and facial expressions; and it allows them to show team members parts, components, materials and other physical objects that relate to the particular product in development—something that would otherwise require an in-person

 

  • There’s a reason high-level managers and executives spend so much time traveling: Strategic planning and budget creation require open discussion and trust—two things that are best done when you can see the faces and body language of the people you are working But with videoconferencing, they can achieve the same level of intimacy without having to leave their offices, reducing the wear and tear that comes from extensive travel, freeing up time for more productive activities when they’re not in meetings and, of course, saving even more money on travel than the average employee.

 

  • The increasingly virtual workplace offers any number of benefits, but one thing gets lost in the translation: Team It’s tough for employees to develop deep and lasting relationships when they rarely see each other and communicate mainly via phone, e-mail and chat. But videoconferencing can change that, by making it possible for team members to see each other on a daily or weekly basis. Simply making that visual connection makes contact more personal—and that makes it easier for people to work together, because they feel like they actually know the people they are working with. That, in turn, makes it more likely that they will share information and skills, supporting each other throughout the work day and for the overall benefit of the business.

 

  • Finally, while some customer and partner engagements require a live, in-person meeting, many don’t—but they will benefit from the visual connection videoconferencing Just as employee relationships are deepened by videoconferencing, so, too, are those with customers and business partners.

The paper from Frost and Sullivan is a good read. If you want to download it- please click here.

 

If you are interested in actually trying this out, please click here and I will give you a 30 day free trial of Visimeet to develop your own use case with!

 

 

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About Vic Levinson
Telecommunications and IT professional with over 20 years experience in Business Telecommunications. Specializing in voice over IP (VoIP) for business: hosted VoIP, business VoIP phone systems, SIP providers, carriers, T1's - the works. Founded Prime Telecommunications in 1993 and providing business communications solutions. Cloud Applications- everything from hosted network security, hosted Disaster Recovery, hosted printer management, data centers and colocation solutions for businesses.

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